Moscow Puppet Theater

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Moscow Puppet Theater

 

(originally the Children’s Book Theater), a theater that opened in 1930 with the staging of Punch and the Hedgehog. Its first director was A. M. Vitman. The theater was renamed the First Moscow Puppet Theater in 1937 and the Moscow Puppet Theater in 1954. The most widely acclaimed performances have included Tales of Pushkin (1957), an adaptation of Gaidar’s Mal’chish-Kibal’chish (1964), Anouilh’s The Lark (1966), Grebennikov’s Ballad of the Granite Monument (1972), and Moliére’s Les Fourberies de Scapin (1972). The principal stage directors have been N. M. Savin (1939–53), Honored Art Worker of the RSFSR V. A. Gromov (1953–62), B. I. Ablynin (1962–67), and Honored Art Worker of the Georgian SSR A. A. Gamsakhurdiia (1967–70). Performances for adults have been included in the Moscow Puppet Theater’s repertoire since 1963.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Daria Wilke's Playing a Part (9780545726078, $18.99) tells of Grisha, who has long loved the Moscow puppet theater and its trappings.
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