Moszkowski, Moritz

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Moszkowski, Moritz

 

Born Aug. 23, 1854, in Wroclaw; died Mar. 4, 1925, in Paris. Polish pianist and composer. Member of the Berlin Academy of Arts from 1899.

Moszkowski studied at the Dresden Conservatory and in Berlin with T. Kullak. After making his piano debut in Berlin in 1873 he lived there until 1897, when he moved to Paris. He toured Europe, performing mainly his own piano salon compositions, noted for their technical brilliance and elegance, and the works of F. Chopin. Among his more popular works were the Spanish Dances for the piano, concert etudes, a waltz, and a piano concerto (Op. 59). Other noteworthy works include the opera Boabdil, the Moorish King (produced in 1892), the ballet Laurin (staged in 1896), the symphonic poem Joan of Arc and other orchestral works, and songs. His études Per Aspera—Ad Astra (Op. 72) and the School of Double Notes are used by teachers.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.