vertical transmission

(redirected from Mother-to-child transmission)
Also found in: Medical.

vertical transmission

[′vərd·ə·kəl tranz′mish·ən]
(genetics)
Passage of genetic information from one cell or individual organism to its progeny by conventional heredity mechanisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nonetheless, no African government has taken on a program to make the mother-to-child transmission drugs universally available.
We must intensify our collective efforts to meet the serious challenges to eliminating mother-to-child transmission of HIV head-on," said Rhonda Zygocki, Executive Vice President, Policy and Planning for Chevron.
Transmission of HIV from an HIV-positive mother to her child during pregnancy, labour, delivery or breastfeeding is called mother-to-child transmission (MTCT).
This special issue on HIV/AIDS prevention, care and treatment in the Region of the Americas: achievements, challenges and perspectives provides an opportunity to present the current response to HIV/AIDS in the Region with a focus on three main areas: HIV prevention, HIV care and treatment, and the elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and congenital syphilis.
Mother-to-child transmission of HIV: Timing and implications for prevention.
Estimates of peripartum and postnatal mother-to-child transmission probabilities of HIV for use in Spectrum and other population-based models.
Permar and colleagues focused on breast milk, which has long been recognized as having some protective quality that inhibits mother-to-child transmission despite multiple daily exposures over months and even years of nursing.
1% rate of mother-to-child transmission at six months--the lowest recorded in a breast-feeding population.
Effective prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) strategies are known to reduce the incidence of paediatric HIV infection.
4) The Cochrane database from 2002 shows the advantages of programmes to prevent mother-to-child transmission, also recognising the fact that transmission rates drop to 1-2% in mothers on antiretroviral therapy.
In a population-based study, using data on all reported pediatric and obstetric HIV infections, researchers examined mother-to-child transmission rates for women who had singleton births between 2000 and 2006.