chevrotain

(redirected from Mousedeer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

chevrotain

(shĕv`rətān'), name for several species of small, ruminant mammals of Africa and SE Asia. Although they are also called mouse-deer, chevrotains are not closely related to true deerdeer,
ruminant mammal of the family Cervidae, found in most parts of the world except Australia. Antlers, solid bony outgrowths of the skull, develop in the males of most species and are shed and renewed annually.
..... Click the link for more information.
, and are classified in a family of their own.

The smallest of the hoofed mammals, they stand 8 to 14 in. (20–66 cm) high at the shoulder, depending on the species. The body is rabbitlike, with an arched back; the legs are very slender and end in small feet; the snout is tapered and somewhat piglike. Their small size makes them easy and important prey for snakes, crocodiles, eagles, and forest-dwelling cats. The reddish brown coat is spotted with white in most species. Chevrotains lack antlers but have tusklike upper canine teeth, used by the males for fighting. The upper incisors are lacking.

Solitary, nocturnal animals of thick forests, chevrotains browse on leaves, twigs, and fruit. They sometimes rest in the branches of low trees. The water chevrotain (Hyemoschus aquaticus) of Africa is always found near water and takes to the water when pursued. The other chevrotains (Moschiola and Tragulus species) are found from India to Indonesia and the Philippines, and some also can swim underwater. Chevrotains are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
..... Click the link for more information.
, subphylum Vertebrata, class Mammalia, order Artiodactyla, family Tragulidae.

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

chevrotain

[′shev·rə‚tān]
(vertebrate zoology)
The common name for four species of mammals constituting the family Tragulidae in the order Artiodactyla. Also known as mouse deer.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(56) If a mousedeer were seen running across the area slashed for rice-sowing, it was inauspicious enough to make one move to another site--for some informants but not all.
It was this mousedeer style of diplomacy that was demonstrated in August 2018, when Prime Minister Mahathir visited China seeking to renegotiate some large infrastructure agreements which he considered to be too expensive.
Another continuing mousedeer strategy, it could be argued, is the continuing ambition to gain local advantage through hierarchical engagement with an external major power.
Javan leopard has significant definite spatial overlap with Java mousedeer and red muntjac, while dholes have overlapped activities with wild boar and banteng.
Spatial use Variables Spearman correlation Pianka index Javan leopard and dhole 0.28 (b) 49 Javan leopard and Java mousedeer 0.13 (b) 55 Javan leopard and wild pig -0.15 53 Javan leopard and red muntjac 0.30 (a) 39 Javan leopard and banteng 0.24 55 Dhole and Java mousedeer -0.03 39 Dhole and wild pig 0.18 (b) 51 Dhole and red muntjac 0.15 (b) 63 Dhole and banteng 0.36 (a) 70
But if on any other day a mousedeer (planok, Tragulus ravus) crossed the jungle path of a gatherer, everyone had to return home for the day (kalau manau li ntalun nggium kayu, nggium kulit kayu, aro planok temalib, lama muli dalai).
The sixth, published in English, consists of a brief compilation of mousedeer stories and a longer folktale, "Leader of the Birds." In the 1990s, the first three of these books were translated and reprinted in Bahasa Malaysia by the Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka (see below).
These habitats are a natural breeding ground for an abundance of wildlife, including sambhar deer, orang utan, muntjac, proboscis monkeys, macaques, silvered langurs, sun bear, wild pig, mousedeer, large and small birds.