mouthfeel

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mouthfeel

[′mau̇th‚fēl]
(food engineering)
An organoleptic property used to describe the overall texture of a food product.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
His complex texture creates an interesting mouth feel that works alongside his loud squeak to activate your pet's natural play drive.
Each whisky has a distinct top note, mouth feel and finish depending on the barley or grain used, distillery, country or place of origin, casks, distillation process, and of course, additional ingredients.
In the (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GOZWV2XxuhA) video , "Why Does Wine Make Your Mouth Feel Dry?" MinuteEarth explains the temporarily leather-like feel in our mouth is linked to the tannins in wine.
This aids suspension, but also greatly decreases mouth feel and consumer acceptance.
The sensory data indicated that mouth feel and texture of dessert were greatly affected by all hydrocolloids particularly; TSG and TSX were found to be effective to improve the overall quality of dessert (Table 1a-1c).
Following an approach that the great whites of Bordeaux have taken - especially with the addition of semillon and, in this case, some sauvignon gris - the result in a ultra-exotic bouquet of tropical fruit and a rich, ripe mouth feel of toasty pear and soft nectarine fruit.
The new ready-to-use Chocolate Battermix combines full fat soft cheese with milk and dark chocolate to give a smooth mouth feel and luxuriously rich chocolate taste.
Palate: Rich, medium bodied mouth feel, sweet vanilla, butterscotch, roasted hazelnuts and toasted coconut.
That means we have a mouth feel and flavor that is closer to wild than to traditionally farmed salmon."
The winners of the America's Best Espresso Competition were chosen by a panel of chefs and restaurateur judges who evaluated one shot from each competitor based on three criteria: flavor complexity, mouth feel and appeal, and aftertaste.
But, although it might make your mouth feel fresher and your teeth feel cleaner, it's no substitute for brushing.
"We've done a lot of research with consumers on what's important to know, and there are common themes: aroma, appearance, taste, mouth feel and the finish of a particular product," he explains.