Mshatta

Mshatta

 

(also al-Mushatta), a castle of the Umayyad (Omayyad) dynasty in Jordan, 25 km southeast of Amman. It was built in the eighth century; some researchers, however, date it to the third or fourth century. It was never completed and is now in ruins.

Mshatta was a square enclosure surrounded by walls with towers; there were regular structures along the sides of an inner court. The castle has become known for its ornamental frieze, which was carved in the stone of the lower part of the southern defensive wall. The frieze consists of large triangles, filled with realistically interpreted, intricately carved designs of interlacing grape vines, palmettos, rosettes, acanthus leaves, flowers, and animals.

REFERENCE

Trümpelmann, L. Mschatta. Tübingen, 1962.
References in periodicals archive ?
These sites provide a missing link to understanding the connection between different civilisations in this part of the world at large." Comprising the basic division of Arabia by ancient geographers into Arabia Felix, Arabia Petra and Arabia Deserta, cities and archaeological sites such as Jerash, Ajloun, Umm Qais, Madaba, Mount Nebo, Mshatta, Qasr Kharana, Qusayr Amra, Little Petra, Petra, and Amman provided the needed practical experience to some of the courses in the CIS programme.
The collection includes an ensemble of red marble columns, with plinths and a segment of roof, from Baalbeck's Jupiter Temple, a monumental reconstruction of Babylon's Ishtar Gate and, from Jordan, the facade of the Umayyad Qasr Mshatta, dated 743.
(144) This deliberate separation was apparently maintained very strictly, as can be observed in the unfinished Umayyad palace at Mshatta in Jordan, where only the eastern part of the facade of the palace--which also forms the outer wall of the interior of the mosque--was left free of figural decoration.
The zenith of the German weeks will be when, at a ceremony on Sunday, 18 May, State Secretary Steinlein will join His Royal Highness Prince El Hassan in re?opening the Desert Castle Mshatta. Over the course of recent years the palace has been restored thanks to substantial financial support from Germany.
HERZFELD, "Mshatta, Hira und Badiya: Die Mittellander des Islam und ihre Baukunst", Jahrbuch der Preuzischen Kunstsammlungen, 42 (1921), pp.
Probably the largest gift presented by a Muslim ruler is the facade of an 8th century Umayyad palace in Mshatta, Jordan, which was shipped piece by piece in 1903 to a Berlin museum.
The relief focused on the villages of Wady Khaled, Mshatta Hassan, Mshatta Hamoud, Bakiya and Areeda.
These sites provide a missing link to understanding the connection between different civilizations in this part of the world at large." Comprising the basic division of Arabia by ancient geographers into Arabia Felix, Arabia Petra and Arabia Deserta, cities and archaeological sites such as Jerash, Ajloun, Umm Qais, Madaba, Mount Nebo, Mshatta, Qasr Kharana, Qusayr Amra, Little Petra, Petra, and Amman provided the needed practical experience to some of the courses in the CIS programme.
(104.) Dominique Sourdel, "Questions de ceremonial abbaside," Revue des Etudes Islamiques 28 (1960): 123-32; Grabar, "Notes," 52; idem, Formation, 58,153; Robert Hillenbrand, "Islamic Art at the Crossroads: East Versus West at Mshatta," in Essays in Islamic Art and Architecture in Honor of Katharina Otto-Dorn, ed.
Se basa esencialmente en ejemplos indicados por Creswell (56), que se remontan a la arquitectura omeya de Oriente, y entre los edificios mencionados se encuentran algunos palacios del desierto como Mshatta. Fue arco caracteristico de la arquitectura abbasi, y asi lo hemos visto en Samarra, y lo es tambien de su expansion y desarrollo, en este caso hacia el Occidente del Islam, por ejemplo en Egipto, en edificios como las mezquitas de Ibn Tulun y al-Hakim en el Cairo, o en el nilometro de la isla de Roda.
The exhibition to be opened to the public on March 21, will conclude on June 2 Over 200 invaluable pieces, including the Rosette from the Mshatta FaE*ade makes up the collection 'Gifts of the Sultan: The Arts of Giving at the Islamic Courts'.