Müllerian mimicry

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Müllerian mimicry

[mi′ler·ē·ən ′mim·ə·krē]
(zoology)
Mimicry between two aposematic species.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mullerian mimicry theory is named after German naturalist Fritz Muller, who first proposed the concept in 1878, less than two decades after Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species in 1859.
The retention of the ancestral state would then seem to be maintained by stabilizing selection due to the advantages of Mullerian mimicry (Gosliner and Johnson, 1999; Gosliner, 2001) and the selective advantage of maintaining a broad search image for recognition by visual predators.
That means clicking works both as Mullerian mimicry (two unpalatable species benefiting by making similar sounds that predators can learn by catching either one) and Batesian mimicry (edible prey borrowing an "unpalatable" signal), says Barber.
This kind of mimicry, in which both look-alike species are noxious, is known as Mullerian mimicry. There's no fraud involved, but both species benefit because predators nibbling at either learn to avoid the other, too.