Muqarnas


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Muqarnas

An original Islamic design involving various combinations of three-dimensional shapes featuring elaborate corbeling.

muqarnas, honeycomb work, stalactite work

muqarnas
An original Islamic design involving various combinations of three-dimensional shapes, corbeling, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The iwan is enclosed with two small stone muqarnas domes.
Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World
24; see also Ebba Koch, "Mughal Palace Gardens from Babur to Shah Jahan (1526-1648)", Muqarnas 14, 1997, pp.
DIFC describes the exterior of the building as minimal, noting however that the interior will be more elaborate and will feature an expansive main chandelier that is inspired by the traditional Muqarnas. Additionally, DIFC says the outer cube form uses a hanging mashrabiya screen that acts as a veil to provide shade and privacy to certain areas and opens at the public areas.
While the exterior is minimal, the interior tends to be more elaborate as it introduces an expansive main chandelier that is inspired by the traditional Muqarnas. The outer cubist form uses a hanging mashrabiya screen that acts as a veil to provide shade and privacy to certain areas and opens at the public areas.
The interior of the mosque features an expansive main chandelier inspired by traditional muqarnas, a type of decorative vaulting typical in Arabic architecture.
The exterior has minimalistic design while the interior tends to be more elaborate with an expansive main chandelier that is inspired by the traditional Muqarnas (a form of ornamented vaulting in Islamic architecture).
Renda, "Sindbadnama: An Early Ottoman Illustrated Manuscript Unique in Iconography and Style," Muqarnas 21 (2004): 311-22.
"The Renaissance Reception of the Alhambra: The Letters of Andrea Navagero and the Palace of Charles V." Muqarnas 11 (1994): 79-102.
Speculations on Patronage', Muqarnas 13 (1996): 27-44, 30-31; Denis Genequand, 'From "Desert Castle" to Medieval Town: Qasr al-Hayr al-Sharqi (Syria)', Antiquity 79 (2005): 350-361; Hugh Kennedy, 'Great Estates and Elite Lifestyles in the Fertile Crescent from Byzantium and Sasanian Iran to Islam', in Albrecht Fuess and Jan-Peter Hartung (eds), Court Cultures of the Muslim World (London: Routledge, 2011), pp.
Muqarnas are a visually stunning allegorical feature of almost every vault and archway, formed from stucco on a wooden base, intended to signify stalactites in the cave where, in his flight from Mecca to Medina, the Prophet sheltered from his enemies.