Muqarnas


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Muqarnas

An original Islamic design involving various combinations of three-dimensional shapes featuring elaborate corbeling.

muqarnas, honeycomb work, stalactite work

muqarnas
An original Islamic design involving various combinations of three-dimensional shapes, corbeling, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
My first abstract works, in the 1990s, were photographs of the domes of Persian mosques and muqarnas.
Muqarnas are a visually stunning allegorical feature of almost every vault and archway, formed from stucco on a wooden base, intended to signify stalactites in the cave where, in his flight from Mecca to Medina, the Prophet sheltered from his enemies.
PRADO-VILAR, "Circular Visions of Fertility and Punishment: Caliphal Ivory Caskets from al-Andalus", Muqarnas, XIV (1997), pp.
Star tiles with metal polish and cruciform tiles, Mosaic tile, Stone facade, Stone stepped muqarnas, Sols inscription (lithography), Masonry calligraphy (lithography), Arabesque ornaments (lithography), Toranj (lithography), Geometric ornaments (lithography).
The monument is decorated by the tiles in the facade and by stucco and Muqarnas in the internal body of the veranda.
Moslem art did, however, develop according to Alhazen's theories in the beautiful geometric patterns seen throughout the Arab world as in the manuscripts, painting, and the three dimensional stucco work called Muqarnas, found in the Middle and Far East, as well as in Granada and other sites in Andalusia.
Chernetsov, "The Eastern Contribution to Medieval Russian Culture," Muqarnas 16 (1999): 97-124.
The authors make skillful use of inserted boxes for longer extratextual explanatory or illustrative notes--Almoravids, muqarnas, pieces of poetry, a dedication inscription (p.
Gulru Necipoglu-Kafadar, "The Suleymaniye Complex: An Interpretation," Muqarnas 3 (1985): 92117; idem, The Age of Sinan: Architectural Culture in the Ottoman Empire (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005).
The Meaning of the Great Mosque of Cordoba in the Tenth Century", Muqarnas 13 (1 de enero), pp.
The former is a painted-wood, silvery-gray, sci-fi-looking spread of interlocking geometric forms based on muqarnas, the richly niched corbels found in mosques; the latter is a life-size replica, in glowing plates of steel, zinc, brass, and copper, of one of the curved, vaulted corners of Cologne Cathedral.