Mura

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Mura

 

a river in Irkutsk Oblast and Krasnoiarsk Krai, RSFSR; a left-bank tributary of the Angara. It measures 330 km long and drains an area of 10,800 sq km. It flows across the Cisangara Plateau in a deep valley with a wide bottom. There are rocky shoals in the river’s lower course. There are rapids near the mouth and, below that, a fjord-shaped estuary. The river is fed by snow and rain. The mean flow rate 79 km from the mouth is 25 cu m per sec. The Mura is used for floating timber.

References in periodicals archive ?
Northumberland ( Muras Cup: C W Boyle, A Johnson, C W Watson, S A Lant; M London, S Richardson, Mrtn Cooper, S Harvey; R Turnbull, J Hume, N Harris, T Kempster; T Birdsey, K Rowe, J Cleverley, S Birdsey; S Tennant, R Keir, B Houghton, K Jameson; S Proctor, S Cairns, I Spoor, P Duffy.
Muras Cup: M London, R Horsfall, B Houghton, S Harvey; C Boyle, A Johnson, G Watson, S Lant; R Chisholm, R Keir, C Cooper, Karl Jameson; S Proctor, S Richardson, N Harris, T Kempster; P Ging, A Trinder, J Cleverley, S Birdsey; S Tennant, R Dougal, P Duffy, R Train.
Arriving in Japan as a self-identified American, Mura is compelled to recover his connection with his family's homeland that had been missing during his midwestern childhood.
We might argue that the development of "turning Japanese," the title of the memoir as well as its focus, is essentially a process of Mura's turning Japanese American with full consciousness.
Thus, before Mura's one-year stay in Japan, his life had taken the common route for a Sansei.
Certain Japanese food, served together with American cuisine at family gatherings on holidays, is probably the only indicator left that marks the Mura family's history and difference.
"Just as Nisei were more likely than Issei to live in non-Japanese neighborhoods and to interact socially with non-Japanese Americans, so Sansei were more likely than their parents to operate outside a Japanese American sphere." (9) Mura is part of this trend.
Nonetheless Mura always found it difficult to fit into his surroundings.
The moment when Mura stepped into the terminal at Narita airport in Tokyo, he was exhausted by the fourteen-hour flight yet suddenly exhilarated, frightened, and astonished by all the faces at customs that looked like his; for the first time in his life his appearance comprised the visual majority (11, 148).
Learning to enjoy Japanese food was perhaps the first thing Mura found that he needed to accomplish, simply for survival.
Shortly after he settled down in Tokyo, Mura was overwhelmed by unfamiliarity, the sharp contrast between cultures, and by the uproar of his feelings.
If before 1984 the author could at least enjoy the coziness of being home in America (though with his anxiety and confusion), the accumulated exposure to Japanese culture dispelled Mura's notion of an American home and hence aggravated his homelessness.