Murray Bay

Murray Bay,

Canada: see La MalbaieLa Malbaie
or Murray Bay,
village (1991 pop. 3,968), S central Que., Canada, at the confluence of the Malbaie (or Murray) River with the St. Lawrence. It is a well-known resort in dairy-farming country.
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References in periodicals archive ?
From six aircraft-deployed field camps (Cape Garry, Hazard Inlet, Murray Bay, Abernethy Bay, Cape Chapman, and Crown Prince Frederik Island (henceforth CPFI); Fig.
Apart from archaeological dates, the Murray Bay curve for the last 8000 years is based primarily on a mix of bowhead and driftwood dates, the only curve with an abundance of dates on both these materials.
The best-dated segment of this RSL curve places it slightly higher than the contemporaneous part of the Murray Bay curve.
RSL curve area 4500 BP beach (m) 2500 BP beach (m) Cape Garry 18 8.5 Hazard Inlet 19 8.5 Murray Bay 20 8.5 Abernethy Bay 24 10 Cape Chapman 36 16 CPFI 40 12-16 Faunal Ranges
We recorded 482 Paleoeskimo dwelling features distributed as follows: 25 at Cape Garry, 58 at Hazard Inlet, 82 at Murray Bay, 107 at Abernethy Bay, 109 at Cape Chapman, and 101 on CPFI.
For example, we found that, with the exception of three Late Dorset "winter" houses at Murray Bay, all features recorded are certainly those that represent temporary occupations and thus relatively high mobility.
Lawrence around Murray Bay, now officially known as 'Malbaie.' Malcolm's son, Alexander, also received a seigneury at Riviere-du-Loup on the south shore of the St.
Dube, Philippe, Charlevoix: Two Centuries at Murray Bay. Kingston and Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1990.
Lawrence at glorious Murray Bay or in wild rose county, a society's recreations tell us much about its values.
To turn from 'Useful Pleasures' to the opulent pages of Philippe Dube's Charlevoix: Two Centuries at Murray Bay is to marvel at an Eastern elite and its pleasures in scenic Charlevoix County on Quebec's North Shore.
on rose-tinted silk paper, where the smell of seaweed lies mingled with the perfume of heliotrope." In his foreword, childhood summer resident Timothy Porteous refers to Dube's blend of "nostalgia and discovery." Indeed, Dube gives us the evolution of present-day Charlevoix County, from a remote seigneury of New France to the post-Conquest property of Jacobite Scots British officers Malcolm Fraser (Mount Murray) and John Nairne (Murray Bay), to the summer playground of an elite by the mid-19th century, thanks to its natural beauty and improved water and then rail transportation to Quebec City and Montreal.
(The latter's birthday party on September 12 traditionally marked the end of the Murray Bay social season in its heyday.) In their activities on water and golf links, Dube sees a "worth ethic relaxed."