Muses


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Related to Muses: Nine Muses

Muses,

in Greek religion and mythology, patron goddesses of the arts, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne. Originally only three, they were later considered as nine. Calliope was the Muse of epic poetry and eloquence; Euterpe, of music or of lyric poetry; Erato, of the poetry of love; Polyhymnia (or Polymnia), of oratory or sacred poetry; Clio, of history; Melpomene, of tragedy; Thalia, of comedy; Terpsichore, of choral song and dance; Urania, of astronomy. Some say that Apollo was their leader. Early places of their worship were the district of Pieria, in Thessaly, where they were often called Pierides, and Mt. Helicon, in Boeotia. The springs of Castalia, Aganippe, and Hippocrene were sacred to them.

Muses

 

in ancient Greek mythology the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne; goddesses who were patronesses of the realms of human spiritual activity, including poetry, art, and the sciences. It was thought that the Muses inspired poets and artists; hence the frequent invocations to them at the beginning of works of ancient poetry. Centers for the worship of the Muses included Pieria near Mount Olympus, Mount Helicon with the spring at Hippocrene, and Delphi (at the foot of Mount Parnassus) with the Castalian Spring. The association with springs indicates that initially the Muses were worshiped as fertility goddesses.

The names of the nine Muses were first given in Hesiod’s Theogony (seventh century B.C.). However, specific realms of art and science were assigned to them only in late antiquity. It was thought that the Muse Euterpe patronized lyric poetry; Clio, history; Thalia, comedy; Melpomene, tragedy; Terpsichore, dance; Erato, erotic poetry; Polyhymnia, hymns; Urania, astronomy; and Calliope, epic poetry. The Muses were represented in European painting (Botticelli, Tintoretto, Tiepolo), and the names of some of them are used as synonyms for the different arts—for example, Terpsichore is used to mean “ballet.”

Muses

(Rom. Camanae) goddesses who presided over the arts. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 172]
See: Music
References in periodicals archive ?
Gregory, Milton and the Muses (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1989), p.
One of these is the Nigerian author's recognition that when Muses are constructed around the powerful or central deities and avatars of a culture, they are subject to both creative, beneficial appropriation and quite troubling and baleful uses.
For Le Muses, we did three weeks of rehearsals, the four actors and me.
The distinction between doxophilia and philosophia is important for understanding Plato's view of inspiration: the madness of those possessed by the muses (Phaedrus 245A).
In modern times, the Muses have taken human form and assumed earthly names such as Maria, Conchita, Linda, and Heloisa.
The three muses, in turn, are on hand as "masters of ceremonies," providing humorous commentary and total involvement in the lives of their earthly charges.
The chief flaw of Suzanne Farrell: Elusive Muse, however, is its title.
It is fitting to end this discussion of the documentation for the pictorial decorations of Francesco II's residence at Gonzaga with a discussion of the muses who clearly did not migrate to Mantua solely on Isabella d'Este's command.
Individual Muses eventually were assigned to the different arts and sciences, especially in Roman times.
Ce lot regroupe les mouvements d~uvres lis l~organisation d~exposition temporaire au Muse des beaux-arts (MBA), Palais des ducs de Lorraine muse Lorrain (ML), Muse de l~cole de Nancy (MEN) regroups au sein de la direction des muses (Nancy-Muses), et de la Galerie Poirel (GP), au renouvellement des expositions permanentes ou des transferts de collections jusqu~ la rserve commune et tout autre mouvement d~uvres.
As seen in snaps posted on NU Muses Instagram account, Tugonon stripped and posed fully naked in front of fashion photographer David Bellemere.
Work Title: Cheers to Muses: Contemporary Works by Asian American Women