Musette


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Musette

 

(1) A type of bagpipe with a folding bellows, two melody-producing pipes, and auxiliary pipes for retuning the instrument. The musette was popular in France during the 17th and 18th centuries.

(2) An oboe with a windbag and eight or nine holes (seven or eight in front and one in back).

(3) An old French folk dance in 2/4, 6/4, or 6/8 time, with a fast tempo. The musette was performed to the accompaniment of an instrument of the same name. In the 18th century, the dance was included in court operatic and balletic works called divertissements. The dance in encountered in the works of Handel, Mozart, Glazunov, and other composers.

References in periodicals archive ?
The tango, valse musette, and polka were also published in versions for piano, under the title: Polka, java, tango (see above).
(7.) Jake expresses his disgust for the group of gay men at the bal musette, and David expresses his disapproval of the gay men who frequent Guillaume's bar.
Coincidentally, another instrument seen in Watteau paintings, as well as in "La Fete a Venise," serves as an objective correlative to the central idea of "cover story." In the description of the spurious painting, the instrument known as the "musette de cour," a small bagpipe popular in France in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, ingeniously symbolizes the cover story.
C'est a partir de ce moment que disparaissent les pseudonymes de Colombine et Musette, trop associes au scandale des funerailles, et qu'Eva rejoint le nouveau journal radical Le Pays, ou elle publie pendant douze ans plus de 790 chroniques sous les noms de Paul S.
Everyone had canteens, a few carried three, and most had musette bags slung across their shoulders and chests that contained waterproof-wrapped food.
The familiar melodies of "Musette in F," "Bist du bei mir," "Menuet in G," and "March in C" by Johann Sebastian Bach from his Anna Magdalena Notebook are presented in a straightforward, detailed, and accessible format in this set of arrangements by Albert Ligotti.
Musette, Link between solitary waves and projective Riccati equations.
Glinka, in addition they played English pieces; "Carol," "Musette" and "Christmas dance" by R.
The Wall Street Journal heralded Archival Clothing's debut piece, a "musette" bag - styled after the small bags used to pass meals to cyclists during road races - as a "manlier man bag," perfect for carrying an iPad.
Sciorra's article provides an elegantly written bridge to Marion Jacobson's "Valtaro Musette: Cross-Cultural Musical Performance and Repertoire among Northern Italians in New York," another ethnographic chapter.
(41.) Mouquet H, Musette P, Gougeon ML, Jacquot S, Lemercier B, Lim A, et al.: B-cell depletion immunotherapy in pemphigus: effects on cellular and humoral immune responses.
A few, particularly those involved in the Parisian bal musette scene, became even more widely known through commercial 78s, the influence of which is likely to have fed back into rural repertoires and playing styles.