Musketeers


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Musketeers

 

a type of infantry in the 16th and 17th centuries. They were armed with muskets and wore a bandoleer with 12 powder-charge containers. A bag with bullets and a match-cord were also attached to the bandoleer.

There were musketeers in all the European armies; in the early 17th century they accounted for half, and later for two-thirds, of the entire strength of the infantry (the rest were pikemen). In France from 1622 to 1775 part of the guards cavalry, composed exclusively of noblemen, was called the royal musketeers. In the late 17th century muskets were replaced by flintlock rifles, but the name “musketeers” was retained for part of the infantry in the 18th and early 19th centuries in the Prussian and certain other armies. In Russia some infantry regiments were called musketeer regiments from 1756 to 1762 and from 1796 to 1811.

References in classic literature ?
At this announcement, during which the door remained open, everyone became mute, and amid the general silence the young man crossed part of the length of the antechamber, and entered the apartment of the captain of the Musketeers, congratulating himself with all his heart at having so narrowly escaped the end of this strange quarrel.
The center of the most animated group was a Musketeer of great height and haughty countenance, dressed in a costume so peculiar as to attract general attention.
"What would you have?" said the Musketeer. "This fashion is coming in.
"Yes; about in the same manner," said another Musketeer, "that I bought this new purse with what my mistress put into the old one."
"Is it not true, Aramis?" said Porthos, turning toward another Musketeer.
This other Musketeer formed a perfect contrast to his interrogator, who had just designated him by the name of Aramis.
"What do you think of the story Chalais's esquire relates?" asked another Musketeer, without addressing anyone in particular, but on the contrary speaking to everybody.
"He only waits for one thing to determine him to resume his cassock, which hangs behind his uniform," said another Musketeer.
In the meanwhile I am a Musketeer; in that quality I say what I please, and at this moment it pleases me to say that you weary me."
'Kasi kami po ang three musketeers. Pinaglalaban namin siyempre yung tama.
The Company of Pikemen & Musketeers, well known for taking part in the Lord Mayor's Show in London, will be entertaining visitors at Chirk Castle this weekend.
WE'RE all familiar with the motto "all for one and one for all" - but did you know these are the famous words of The Three Musketeers? If you remember this classic novel, it recounts the adventures of a young man named D'Artagnan who travels to Paris to join the Musketeers, taking on many daring deeds along his way.