Brave New World

(redirected from Mustapha Mond)
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Related to Mustapha Mond: brave new world, Bernard Marx

Brave New World

Aldous Huxley’s grim picture of the future, where scientific and social developments have turned life into a tragic travesty. [Br. Lit.: Magill I, 79]

Brave New World

picture of world’s condition 600 years from now. [Br. Lit.: Brave New World]
References in periodicals archive ?
Mustapha Mond was a scientist before serving as a world controller.
Mustapha Mond, a World Controller, describes its achievements thus:
But the stamp of the World Controller's Office was at the head of the paper and the signature of Mustapha Mond, bold and black, across the bottom.
Huxley's warnings, offered through Mustapha Mond and other of his characters, were not the idle rambling of a science fiction writer.
A reader can more easily make these associations due to the editors' decision to begin the collection with lengthy excerpts of Chapters 1, 16, and 17 of BNW; it is Chapter 17 which features the climactic discussion between John the Savage and Mustapha Mond, one of the World Controllers:
"In fact," said Mustapha Mond, "you're claiming the right to be unhappy."
Surely Mustapha Mond's respect for John the Savage's idealism hardly equals an acceptance of his argument; John winds up committing suicide while Mustapha goes back to his business as a well-read puppet-master.
Prominent places and famous landmarks, such as Charing Cross Tower ("Charing-T Tower" [BNW 68]) and Big Ben ("Big Henry" [99]), have been renamed for Ford; the highest religious and temporal authority, Mustapha Mond, is addressed respectfully by Fordian titles, namely, "Our Ford" or "his lordship" (35, 37).
Wells and Sir Alfred Mond in the composite figure of Mustapha Mond because he considered both men proponents of antihumanistic rationalization--the reorganization of society on an allegedly more scientific, more efficient, more technological basis.
However, by the time Mustapha Mond enters the novel in chapter 3, he is hailed as "his lordship" (BNW 37), Henry Ford's disciple and successor--not "Alfred Mond or Henry Ford" but both.
Yet Mustapha Mond and his fellow World Controllers are a parody of the Samurai who run things in Wells's A Modern Utopia.
(II: 11314) When Huxley ranks the break-up of the family "among the greatest of our Anglo-Saxon blessings" (The Decline of the Family" II: 116), he sounds disconcertingly like Mustapha Mond. The brave new world, one understands, is satirized for its bad decisions, not for the problems it tries to resolve.