myasthenic crisis


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Related to myasthenic crisis: Tensilon test

myasthenic crisis

[¦mī·əs¦thēn·ik ′krī·səs]
(medicine)
Profound myasthenia and respiratory paralysis associated with myasthenia gravis.
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Postoperative myasthenic crisis occurred in 40 cases: 17 cases in 1-month subgroup, 14 in 3-month subgroup, and 9 in Group B as shown in [Table 2].
Successful management of pregnancy- aggravated myasthenic crisis after complete remission of the disease [Electronic version].
In this descriptive study, patients admitted between 01.10.2012 and 01.12.2013 in the Neurology ward, Medical ward and IMCU of Rajiv Gandhi Government General Hospital, Madras Medical College with symptoms and signs of myasthenic crisis, fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled after explaining and getting consent for the study.
Gudelj, "Myasthenic crisis as a side effect of methimazole therapy: Case report," Acta clinica Croatica, vol.
Myasthenic crisis can be life-threatening and often involves critical care monitoring.
Collaboration with the nephrologist and neurologist, as well as the outpatient infusion center, allowed Tom to schedule treatments before he experienced a myasthenic crisis. This prevented not only a myasthenic crisis but also hospitalization, which could increase his risk of infection.
Clinical characteristics and predictive factors of myasthenic crisis after thymectomy.
When patients with MG are in a critical situation such as a myasthenic crisis or in preparation for surgery, plasmapheresis is a recommended therapy.
If the patient improves, a myasthenic crisis has occurred and the dose of the medication must be increased.
The Tensilon test may be used to differentiate cholinergic crisis from a worsening of the disease, called myasthenic crisis. When Tensilon is administered IV, the weakness will improve if the patient is in myasthenic crisis but the weakness will worsen if the patient is in cholinergic crisis (since Tensilon compounds the "overdose" of the Mestinon).
AFP can include clinical syndromes caused by acute dysfunction of the anterior horn cells (e.g., acute flaccid myelitis), peripheral motor nerves or nerve roots (e.g., Guillain-Barre syndrome), neuromuscular junction (e.g., botulism or myasthenic crisis), or muscle (e.g., acute myopathies) (3,4).
After considering initial clinical presentation of the patient's possibilities of neurotoxic snake envenomation, botulism, injury to head and spine, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, unknown toxin and myasthenic crisis were all looked into.