Mycotoxicoses

Mycotoxicoses

 

diseases of animals caused by poisonous substances that have accumulated in fodders infested with toxic fungi. Mycotoxicoses appear suddenly and affect large numbers of animals; the diseases are not contagious and cease with a change of feed. The diseases may arise in the autumn or spring when the animals pasture on unharvested overwintered grasses and frozen vegetation. Stabled animals may be affected by my cotoxicoses if they are fed vegetable feeds that have been stored in humid places.

The severity and clinical manifestations of mycotoxicoses depend on the amount of toxin that has entered the body, the duration of its intake, and the species and age characteristics of the macroorganism. Mycotoxicoses that have been studied have been separated as independent nosologic units and are named according to the genus of the fungus that causes the intoxication.

References in periodicals archive ?
Foodborne mycotoxicoses, risk assessment and underestimated hazard of masked mycotoxins and joint mycotoxin effects or interaction.
Reduced growth rate may be the only clue for chronic aflatoxicosis and other mycotoxicoses (Raisbeck et al.
Once incorporated, these toxic chemical compounds produced by moulds are able to induce a variety of diseases, so called mycotoxicoses.
Sherry and Rogers (2003) reported that [alpha]-LA is a potential agent to protect against mycotoxins and treat mycotoxicoses such as mushroom poisoning.
fumigatus may cause respiratory diseases such as pneumonia, asthma, pulmonary aspergillosis bronchitis, allergic alveolitis and possibly mycotoxicoses in the immunocompromised host (Lacey and Dutkiewicz, 1994; Land et al.
Mold mycelium is also dangerous and is associated with mycosis and mycotoxicoses.
Plant poisoning and mycotoxicoses of importance in horses in southern Africa.
Serious and lethal veterinary and human mycotoxicoses, however, have been reported due to large ingestions of foods heavily overgrown with molds.