Myospalax


Also found in: Dictionary.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Myospalax

 

(mole-rats), a genus of rodents of the subfamily Cricetinae. The body measures 15–27 cm in length, and the tail, 3–7 cm. Mole-rats lack external ears and have very small eyes. The claws on the front extremities are enlarged and adapted to burrowing. The fur is of a single color, usually brownish or ash gray. The guard hairs are not developed.

The genus embraces five species, which are distributed in southern Siberia and Central and East Asia. The USSR has two species, which are found in southwestern Siberia, the Altai, Transbaikalia, and the Primor’e, in plains-and mountain-steppe regions. The animals are subterranean and dig complex burrows as much as 3 m deep. They feed on underground parts of plants. In some places they are harmful to crops. Their hides are dressed, although the fur is second-rate.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effects of mounds of the Cansu mole-rat (Myospalax cansus Lyon.) on shrub-steppe vegetation in the Loess Plateau, North-west China.
Differences of glycolysis in skeletal muscle and lactate metabolism in liver between plateau zokor (Myospalax baileyi) and plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae).
Characteristics of pulmonary acinus structure in the plateau zokor (Myospalax baileyi) and plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae).
Difference in oxygen uptake in skeletal muscles between plateau zokor (Myospalax rufescens baileyi) and plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniac).
In order to manage Eospalax (Myospalax) baileyi (Plateau zokors) pests with physical method, the efficacy of four different arrow traps was tested to control the plateau zokor in Sichuan Northwest Prairie, China.
Eospalax (Myospalax) baileyi, zokor, population density, arrow trap.
The Eospalax baileyi (plateau zokor, formerly Myospalax baileyi) is a subterranean burrowing endemic rodent (blind mole rat) inhabiting areas of 2600-4600 metres above sea level on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (Fan and Shi, 1982).