Myrmecochory


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Related to Myrmecochory: Elaiosome

Myrmecochory

 

the distribution of seeds and other plant embryos by ants. The ants eat the arillodes and caruncles, leaving the seeds themselves unharmed. An ant colony may disperse tens of thousands of seeds in this manner during a single growing season, to distances of 100 to 1,000 m from the anthill. Myrmecochory has been observed in temperate zones and in the tropics (primarily in Brazil). In temperate zones it occurs among numerous monocotyledons (Allium, Scilla, Gagea, Ornithogalum, Luzula, Melica, and Stipa) and dicotyledons (Filago, Corydalis, Chelidonium, Polygala, Cyclamen, Symphytum, Sempervivum, Thymus, Nepeta, Veronica, and Melampyrum). In some plants the seeds are distributed solely by ants; in others the seeds are dispersed by more than one means.

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For example, barochory (primary dispersal) could be followed by myrmecochory or hydrochory (secondary dispersal).
Yulong were dispersed by anemochory, mammalichory, and myrmecochory. Anemochory was the major dispersal mode, especially in the earliest succession stage, in which the dominant species dispersed their seeds by wind.
Myrmecochory in Viola: dynamics of seed-ant interactions in some West Virginia species.
This similarity, without the benefits of myrmecochory, puts these eggs at risk: while insectivorous birds may avoid seed-shaped eggs, granivorous birds should be more likely to eat them (Goeldi 1886).
In this study, we examined the hypothesis that disturbance disrupts the mutualistic system of myrmecochory. We sampled the ground-foraging ant community and the rate of discovery of baits in a series of habitats that represent a range of disturbance.
Dispersal by ants, myrmecochory, is a special form of dyszoochory and is very important in many herbaceous plants, such as louseworts (Pedicularis), woodrushes (Luzula), asarabacca (Asarum europaeaum), and Galeobdolon [=Lamiastrum] luteum.
Myrmecochory, seed dispersal by ants, is a dominant dispersal syndrome in the understory of temperate deciduous forests (Beattie and Culver 1981, Handel et al.
Effects of ants, ground beetles and the seed-fall patterns on myrmecochory of Erythronium japonicum Decue (Liliaceae).
First evidence of myrmecochory in fleshy-fruited shrubs of the Mediterranean region.
In general, calyx morphology is well adapted to achene dispersal (Bouman & Meeuse, 1992) which, in the Mediterranean region, often occurs by diplochory (barochory and anemochory or myrmecochory).