Myrtus


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Myrtus

 

(myrtle), a genus of evergreen shrubs or trees of the family Myrtaceae. The leaves are opposite and entire, and the flowers are usually solitary, regular, and bisexual. The fruit is a berry. There are approximately 100 species of Myrtus, distributed primarily in subtropical and tropical America. Species are also encountered in Eurasia, Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. These plants, particularly the classic myrtle (Myrtus communis), have been cultivated widely in the Mediterranean region since ancient times. The classic myrtle, a decorative branching shrub, is up to 5 m high. It has ovate-lanceolate, acuminate, leathery leaves, and large (up to 3 cm in diameter), fragrant white or pink flowers. The fruits are blue-black. In the USSR the classic myrtle is grown in the Crimea and on the Black Sea shore of the Caucasus; further north it is cultivated as a house plant. The leaves and other parts of myrtle plants contain essential oils that are used to make perfumes. The dried and fresh fruits are used as flavorings in cooking.

REFERENCE

Derev’ia i kustarniki SSSR, vol. 5. Moscow-Leningrad, 1960.
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and Castanea sativa, the predominant pollens of Myrtus communis were determined in honey samples from Algeria and Argentina (Costa et al., 1995; Ouchemoukh et al., 2007).
Keywords: Dandruff, Myrtus communis L., Ketoconazole, Seborrheic dermatitis, Traditional Persian medicine.
Garjan, "The effect of essential oils from Laurus nobilis and Myrtus commonis on the adults of Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella zeller (Lep.: Pyralidae)," Journal of Essential Oil-Bearing Plants, vol.
According to this survey and documents of traditional manuscripts, six medicinal herbs including Myrtus communis, Melissa officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Malus domestica, Terminalia chebula, and Curcuma zedoaria were cited for both cardiology and geriatric approaches.
Citrullus colocynthis [Figure 8] are used for dog and insect bites, while Myrtus communis is used for scorpion stings.
Essential oils of myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) of the Mediterranean litteral.
Dwi hefyd wedi meddwl y baswn i'n lecio cael myrtwydd (Myrtus communis; Myrtle) yn yr ardd, ac mae hwn eto yn blanhigyn meddyginiaethol.
Remedies: Abrotanum, Acalypha, Apis, Aranea, Arsenicum lodatum, Atrax, Balsamum, Brucea, Bromium, Calcarea lodata, Calcarea Phosphorica, Cereus Bonplandii, Cimicifuga, Cistus, Coccus Cacti, Coffea, Drosera, Elaterium Euonymus, Ferrum lodatum, Ferrum Phosphoricum, Fluoric Acid, Ginseng, lodum Kali Phosphoricum, Lactrodectus, Magnesia Phosphorica, Mygale, Myristica, Myrtus Communis, Natrum Phosphoricum, Oleander, Phelandrium, Phosphorus, Pix, Rumex, Salix Niger, Sambucus, Senega, Succinic Acid, Tarantula, Theridion, Ustilago, Verbascum, Vespa.
Ejemplos representativos de estos procedimientos los constituyen los trabajos publicados sobre Vetiveria zizanioides (Danh, et al., 2009), Myrtus communis (Pereira, et al., 2013; Ghasemi, et al., 2011), Satureja hortensis (Khajeh, 2011), Pimpinella affinis (Dashtianeh, 2013), y Piper nigrum (Bagheri, et al., 2014).
Various herbal preparations have been reported for RAS management including Myrtus communis [11], chamomilla [2], Satureja khuzestanica [12], Zataria multiflora, Anthemis nobilis [11], and Punica granatum [21].
(Rutaceae); Syzygium aromaticum L., Myrtus communis L., and Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh.