Mysia

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Mysia

(mĭsh`ēə), ancient region, NW Asia Minor. It was N of Lydia and its coast faced Lesbos. Mysia was not a political unit, and it passed successively to Lydia, Persia, Macedon, Syria, Pergamum, and Rome.

Mysia

 

an ancient country in northwestern Asia Minor located in the northwestern part of modern Turkey.

The population of Mysia included Mysians, Phrygians, Trojans, and Aeolians. Mysia was conquered in the seventh century B.C. by the Lydians, in the mid-sixth century by the Persians, and at the end of the fourth century by Alexander of Macedon.

In the second and third centuries B.C., Mysia became the most important part of the kingdom of Pergamum. In 133 B.C., Mysia was absorbed into the Roman province of Asia. In the late Roman period, Mysia became a separate province known as the Hellespont.

myrtle

1. any evergreen shrub or tree of the myrtaceous genus Myrtus, esp M. communis, a S European shrub with pink or white flowers and aromatic blue-black berries
2. short for crape myrtle
3. bog myrtle
4. creeping or trailing myrtle US and Canadian another name for periwinkle (the plant)

Mysia

an ancient region in the NW corner of Asia Minor
References in periodicals archive ?
The poet tells us that to appease Heracles the Mysians promised never to stop searching for him, and that to this day the people of Cius (a city Polyphemus would later found in Mysia) still "inquire after [[phrase omitted]] Hylas" (1.1354).
[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.] (63) they point to an ancient shrine of Carian Zeus at Mylasa, to which Mysians and Lydians, as brethren of the Carians (for Lydus and Mysus, they say, were brothers of Car), are admitted, but not those who spoke the same language as the Carians but were of another people.
Possibly then, Herodotus (or his source) altered the genealogical positions of the eponymous figures, Car and Torrhebus, for a Labraundean environment where promotion of Torrhebians was not required, but that of Lydians and Mysians was.
[and the Mysian prince received his cure from the very same spearpoint, the spearpoint from which had received his wound.] Such uses of Telephus in erotic and other contexts were doubtless familiar to Juvenal: there is an easy transition then from the poet who inflicts his elegies on the speaker to the bad tragedians who produce a Telephus or an Orestes (inpune ...
11.326f.): although not guilty of adultery, she accepted Polynices' gift of a gold necklace in return for betraying her husband to certain death.(91) A similar story was told in the Little Iliad, of how Astyoche, the wife of the Mysian king Telephus, sent her son Eurypylus off to his death at Troy when Priam gave her the Golden Vine.(92) Another Odyssean example is provided by the childhood of Eumaeus (Od.
251) that because the Stoics agreed with Aristotle in situating moral development in the context of specific and circumscribed groups (the family, the peer-group, the city), their characterisation of the fully developed moral position as one of total impartiality--so that the "furthest Mysian" has as strong a moral claim on me as the members of my family, say--points up a deficiency in Aristotle's account, which refuses to extend other-concern so far.
An apparent Athenian peasant, who at times seems to identify himself with one, or even two, Athenian comic poets, dressed in comic costume, presumably with phallos, on top of which he has just, pointlessly, put a set of supposed Euripidean rags; with them he has adopted the tragic character of Telephos, re-enacting the moment when that Greek son of Heracles, who was a Mysian king, was wounded and pretending to be a Greek beggar.