Mysia

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Mysia

(mĭsh`ēə), ancient region, NW Asia Minor. It was N of Lydia and its coast faced Lesbos. Mysia was not a political unit, and it passed successively to Lydia, Persia, Macedon, Syria, Pergamum, and Rome.

Mysia

 

an ancient country in northwestern Asia Minor located in the northwestern part of modern Turkey.

The population of Mysia included Mysians, Phrygians, Trojans, and Aeolians. Mysia was conquered in the seventh century B.C. by the Lydians, in the mid-sixth century by the Persians, and at the end of the fourth century by Alexander of Macedon.

In the second and third centuries B.C., Mysia became the most important part of the kingdom of Pergamum. In 133 B.C., Mysia was absorbed into the Roman province of Asia. In the late Roman period, Mysia became a separate province known as the Hellespont.

myrtle

1. any evergreen shrub or tree of the myrtaceous genus Myrtus, esp M. communis, a S European shrub with pink or white flowers and aromatic blue-black berries
2. short for crape myrtle
3. bog myrtle
4. creeping or trailing myrtle US and Canadian another name for periwinkle (the plant)

Mysia

an ancient region in the NW corner of Asia Minor
References in periodicals archive ?
Possibly then, Herodotus (or his source) altered the genealogical positions of the eponymous figures, Car and Torrhebus, for a Labraundean environment where promotion of Torrhebians was not required, but that of Lydians and Mysians was.
3 shows that Xanthus had familiarity with the Lydian language (he explained that the origin of the name of the Mysians was drawn from a Lydian word; shown by translating a Greek word back into Lydian, and transliterated to Greek).
32) For other (Mermnad) examples of politically convenient marriages note Gyges' marriage to Candaules' widow, Toudo (a Mysian princess), and Alyattes offering his daughter to the Median crown prince, Astyages (see Balcer, Sparda by the Bitter Sea, 48-51, where he discusses 'harem factionalism').
Hyginus confirms that he did kill several of them (Fabulae 244) and Aristotle in his Poetics (1460A) reports that a play called the Mysians (by Aeschylus or Sophocles) had a non-speaking Telephus, which Gantz says "may indicate that he came to Mysia seeking purification from the pollution of those murders" (429).
Telephus moved Nereus's grandson, against whom he had defiantly marshaled the ranks of the Mysians and against whom he had hurled pointed weapons.