butane

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butane

(byo͞o`tān), C4H10, gaseous alkanealkane
, any of a group of aliphatic hydrocarbons whose molecules contain only single bonds (see chemical bond). Alkanes have the general chemical formula CnH2n+2.
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, a hydrocarbon that is obtained from natural gas or by refining petroleum. It can be liquefied at room temperature by compression. There are two structural isomersisomer
, in chemistry, one of two or more compounds having the same molecular formula but different structures (arrangements of atoms in the molecule). Isomerism is the occurrence of such compounds. Isomerism was first recognized by J. J. Berzelius in 1827.
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 of butane. In normal butane, or n-butane, the four carbon atoms are joined in a continuous, unbranched chain; in isobutane, or 2-methylpropane, three of the carbon atoms are joined to the fourth by single bonds, resulting in a branched structure. The two isomers differ in certain of their chemical and physical properties, e.g., liquid n-butane has a higher boiling point (−0.6°C;) at atmospheric pressure than that of liquid isobutane (−10.2°C;).

butane

[′byü‚tān]
(organic chemistry)
C4H10 An alkane of which there are two isomers, n and isobutane; occurs in natural gas and is produced by cracking petroleum.

butane

a colourless flammable gaseous alkane that exists in two isomeric forms, both of which occur in natural gas. The stable isomer, n-butane, is used mainly in the manufacture of rubber and fuels (such as Calor Gas). Formula: C4H10
References in periodicals archive ?
1, Methane; 2, ethane; 3, propane; 4, isobutane; 5, n-butane; 6, isopentane; 7, n-pentane; 8, methyl cyclopentane; 9, 2-methylpentane; 10, n-hexane; 11, methyl cyclohexane; 12, 2/3-methylhexane; 13, n-heptane; 14, benzene; 15, n-octane; 16, methylbenzene; 17, n-nonane; 18, [beta]-xylene.
Among hydrocarbons, relatively high correlation coefficients were found among i-butane and n-butane, propane and i-butane, and propane and n-butane, whereas methane showed rather moderate correlation with ethane and no correlation with its higher gaseous homologues.
However, it contains only proprietary information about propane and n-butane chemistry [10].
In cases where n-butane was added, the butane container was also chilled to below -10[degrees] C, and the butane was bubbled through the chilled sample through a filter positioned at the bottom of the sample container.
This can be attributed to the fact, that LPG 4 contains a relatively high [C.sub.3] content of 24.3 % (m/m), which results in a reduced density and an increased compressibility of the fuel, compared to pure n-butane.
Eleven examined working fluids can be sorted according to their thermal and exergy efficiencies from high to low performances as cyclohexane, n-hexane, R-113, n-pentane and Iso-pentane, R-245fa, n-butane, Iso-butane, RC-318 and R-236fa, and at last R-227ea.
It is proved that n-butane concentration increases after the mechanical activation of sample II hydrate.
The latter is used for ethane, propane, iso-butane, and n-butane because their absorption spectra overlap with each other severely while the former is used for the others.
Composition of the retorting gas for HJ oil shale Compound Percentage, Calorific value, Weighted calorific vol.% kJ/mol value, kJ/mol Nitrogen 59.45 0 0.00 Carbon 9.01 283 26.73 monoxide Carbon 18.42 0 0.00 dioxide Methane 1.36 890 12.69 Hydrogen 11.00 285 32.96 Ethane 0.16 1560 1.31 Acetylene 0.15 1299 1.99 Propane 0.01 2220 0.14 Ethylene 0.04 1409 0.56 Butylene 0.15 2877 4.40 n-Butane 0.11 2877 3.26 iso-Butane 0.04 2877 1.18 Hydrogen 0.10 1000 1.05 sulphide Table 8.
First, the spectra are heavily overlapping as seen in Figure 2 where the mid-infrared absorption spectra of methane, ethane, propane and n-butane are shown.