NAS


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NAS

(networking)
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NAS

(1) See network access server.

(2) (Network Attached Storage) A file server that connects to the network. A NAS contains the file sharing components of a server and also runs NAS-related programs such as backup, cloud synchronization, streaming and surveillance. NAS units generally run a Linux OS, and they process I/O requests by supporting the popular file sharing protocols, primarily CIFS for Windows and NFS for Mac, Unix and Linux. See file server, CIFS and NFS.

Just Plug It In
Unlike a storage area network (SAN), which is an enterprise-class storage system, a NAS can be quickly added to a home or local network by plugging it into a switch or router. See SAN, NAS gateway, direct attached storage and NetApp Filer.


A Raft of QNAP Apps
QNAP makes a variety of popular NAS products from personal storage to enterprise use (top unit). Its QTS operating system supports more than 150 apps covering the categories itemized above.







Network vs. Channel Attached
Data in a NAS are accessed via the network, whereas storage area networks (SANs) have high-speed connections to huge storage arrays.


Network vs. Channel Attached
Data in a NAS are accessed via the network, whereas storage area networks (SANs) have high-speed connections to huge storage arrays.







Industrial Strength NAS
Network Appliance popularized the enterprise NAS device. Sophisticated units like this can hold many terabytes of storage and provide mission critical reliability for large enterprises. (Image courtesy of Network Appliance, Inc.)







The Early 2000s
In 2002, Iomega introduced a line of economical RAID-based NAS units for personal and SOHO use. This model included a hot spare ready to replace a failed disk drive. Iomega was later acquired by Lenovo. (Image courtesy of Iomega Corporation.)
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References in periodicals archive ?
NAS virtualization products have several key applications and benefits to file storage environments:
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A program was envisioned that would provide NAs with additional education and training on a variety of care and customer service issues.
NAS installation requires some knowledge of network topology and how IP addresses are provided for the target network.
The Hitachi Freedom NAS may include multiple NAS server engines, in a free-standing or clustered configuration for a High-Availability fail-over mode, depending on the customer's storage capacity requirements.
With the goal of creating an infrastructure-wide approach to NAS management, one needs to realize that device-centric approaches manage files statically linked to a user, while a network-centric approach manages files as dynamically accessible information, regardless of physical location or business purpose.
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However, when used as a NAS server, this flexibility amounts to overhead unrelated to the core efficiencies of the server, alongside marginal performance.
Starting at under $29,300 for 180GB of storage, the VA Linux 9205 is the first in a family of NAS solutions from VA Linux Systems.
NAS is also getting better at hosting block-based data, meaning IT can safely use qualifying NAS as database storage.
CrosStor's NAS software is a complete, programmable operating system for network-attached storage (NAS) appliances.
Many good-sized customers, including government, agencies, large corporations, and what's left of the SSPs, do host their Exchange databases on NAS. The most successful installations use fast networks and sophisticated NAS clusters from vendors like EMC and NetApp (though unlike NetApp, EMC does not push NAS for hosting Exchange databases).