NASA Day of Remembrance

NASA Day of Remembrance

Last Thursday of January
To commemorate and honor those who have died in America's space program, NASA established the Day of Remembrance in 2004. The day particularly focuses on those astronauts who died in three NASA space tragedies: the three astronauts who died in the Apollo 1 fire on January 27, 1967 (Roger Chafee, Gus Grissom, and Ed White); the seven astronauts who died in the Shuttle Challenger disaster of January 28, 1986 (Gregory B. Jarvis, Christa McAuliffe Ronald E. McNair, Ellison S. Onizuka, Judith A. Resnik, Francis R. Scobee, and Michael J. Smith); and the seven astronauts who died in the Shuttle Columbia tragedy of February 1, 2003 (Micahel P. Anderson, David Brown, Kalpana Chawla, Laurel Salton Clark, Rick D. Husband, William C. McCool, and Ilan Ramon). The day also remembers those NASA employees who died in training accidents, car crashes, and maintenance accidents, including the helicopter crew who perished while engaged in the Columbia debris recovery effort.
NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C., observes the day with remarks by a number of high-ranking officials and astronauts and a roll call of all those who have died. The event is broadcast by closed-circuit television to NASA facilities throughout the world. At Cape Canaveral in Florida, a minute of silence is observed at noon. Flags at all NASA facilities are flown at half-staff.
CONTACTS:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Ste. 5K39
NASA Headquarters
Washington, D.C. 20546-0001
202-358-0001; fax: 202-358-3469
www.nasa.gov
Full browser ?