NFPA


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NFPA

Abbr. for the National Fire ProtectionAssociation.
References in periodicals archive ?
NFPA 25 is the baseline for inspection, testing, and maintenance of water-based fire protection systems.
* NFPA 652, the Standard on the Fundamentals of Combustible Dust, covers the requirements for managing combustible dust fires and explosions across industries, processes and dust types.
This textbook describes how to conduct life fire training evolutions in a safe and compliant way, explaining how to meet National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards while preparing firefighters through the experiences of live fire training in acquired and permanent live fire training structures and mobile enclosed props.
Prior to 2007, this specific NFPA 10 standard did not exist in its current language.
In 2015, there were an estimated 1,760 home cooking fires on Thanksgiving, according to the NFPA.
There is no way the Grenfell Tower assembly would pass an NFPA 285 test.
The seminar, organised by the Ministry of Interior and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), was attended by firefighting experts and specialists
NFPA 1033 Standard for Professional Qualifications for Fire Investigator, originally published in 1987, has not gained similar recognition.
The new NFPA 652 requires the owner/operator of a facility with potentially combustible dusts to determine whether the materials that they are handling/processing are combustible or explosible and, if so, to characterize their ignition sensitivity and explosion severity properties, as required to support the dust hazard assessment (DHA).
Primary applicable laboratory gas storage and safety standards are NFPA 1: Fire Code; NFPA 101: Life Safety Code; NFPA 70: National Electric Code; NFPA 45: Fire Protection for Laboratories Using Chemicals; and NFPA 55: Standard for the Storage, Use and Handling of Compressed and Liquefied Gases in Portable Cylinders.
* NFPA 484: Standard for Combustible Metals, Current Edition: 2012
The campaign is now backed by the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), a non-profit, fire prevention advocacy group with New England roots that began in 1896 with the increase in available electricity and booming factories.