California nebula

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California nebula

(NGC 1499) An emission nebula – an H II region – that lies in the constellation Perseus and is ionized by the star Xi (ξ) Persei.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The California Nebula, NGC 1499, in Perseus is a large HII region--around 2x1[degrees];
Even rather dim M76, the Little Dumbbell Nebula, and NGC 1499, the elusive California Nebula, get considerable attention.
NGC 1499, the California Nebula, along with variable and multiple stars, so in many ways this is also a general purpose atlas.
Visually the comet was a huge, diluted cloud not unlike the California Nebula, NGC 1499, when the two rendezvoused in March.
Known for decades as the California Nebula, NGC 1499 appears to billow serenely among the stars of Perseus about 12[degrees] north of the Pleiades star cluster, M45 (not shown).
Edward Emerson Barnard discovered NGC 1499 visually with the 6-inch Cooke refractor at Tennessee's Vanderbilt Observatory in 1885.
While a narrowband filter improves the view, NGC 1499 responds much better to a hydrogen-beta (H[beta]) filter, which renders it an easy target for my little scope.
Preliminary tests of hypered PJM-2 by astrophotography expert Jerry Lodriguss showed that its red sensitivity surpassed that of the Pro 400 in recording the ionized hydrogen emission of NGC 1499, the California Nebula, A single 30-minute exposure of the Veil Nebula with a 500-mm f/4 telephoto lens and Lumicon Deep-Sky filter revealed red, green, and yellow hues.