Whirlpool galaxy

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Whirlpool galaxy

(M51; NGC 5194) A well-defined type Sc spiral galaxy (see Hubble classification) that is face-on to us. It lies at a distance of 6 Mpc in the constellation Canes Venatici, the nearest bright star being Eta Ursae Majoris in the Plough. A small companion galaxy, NGC 5195, appears to be connected to it by an extension of one of the spiral arms. Total magnitude: 8.1.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Whirlpool galaxy

[′wərl‚pül ‚gal·ik·sē]
(astronomy)
A spiral galaxy of type Sc (open spiral structure), seen face on, in the constellation Canes Venatici.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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A dwarf galaxy about 26 million light-years away has been found with a supermassive black hole at its center that suffers from periodic "indigestion." The phenomenon leads to the matter being blasted out into the interstellar medium from NGC 5195, which is in the process of merging with its larger neighbor NGC 5194, also called the Whirlpool Galaxy.
In making this new discovery, NASA looked into the Chandra X-ray Observatory's new data from a nearby galaxy NGC 5195, which is now merging with its companion galaxy NGC 5194, also known as "The Whirlpool."
M51 (NGC 5194) The Whirlpool Galaxy is a grand design spiral galaxy located in the constellation of Canes Venatici, "the Hunting Dogs".
The galaxy is officially named Messier 51 (M51) or NGC 5194, but often goes by its nickname of the "Whirlpool Galaxy."
the Schmidt-Kennicutt Law) in the inner disk of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5194 (a.k.a.
Located in Messier 51 (NGC 5194), the Whirlpool Galaxy, the SN was quickly classified as a young Type IIb core collapse event and represents the third modern SN event that the galaxy has hosted (the two previous being the Type Ic SN 1994I and the Type IIP SN 2005cs).
Thus the designation M51 belongs not only to the magnificent spiral, NGC 5194, but also to its interacting companion, NGC 5195.
This image of the core of NGC 5194, the larger of two interacting galaxies called the Whirlpool, for the first time provides an X-ray portrait of a rare, so-called 1C supernova (box).
NGC 5195 is a small galaxy that is currently merging with the larger spiral galaxy NGC 5194 -- better known as "the Whirlpool."  The interaction between the two galaxies could have fed NGC 5195's black hole, leading to emissions observed by Chandra.
THE WHIRLPOOL GALAXY, M51 OR NGC 5194, was the first to show astronomers spiral structure (see page 116), and it remains one of the closest, best-studied examples of a spiral galaxy.
Predictably, I began with Messier 51 (NGC 5194), the Whirlpool Galaxy.
Of all the countless island universes scattered across the sky, none seem as exciting as M51 (NGC 5194), the renowned Whirlpool Galaxy.