Whirlpool galaxy

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Whirlpool galaxy

(M51; NGC 5194) A well-defined type Sc spiral galaxy (see Hubble classification) that is face-on to us. It lies at a distance of 6 Mpc in the constellation Canes Venatici, the nearest bright star being Eta Ursae Majoris in the Plough. A small companion galaxy, NGC 5195, appears to be connected to it by an extension of one of the spiral arms. Total magnitude: 8.1.

Whirlpool galaxy

[′wərl‚pül ‚gal·ik·sē]
(astronomy)
A spiral galaxy of type Sc (open spiral structure), seen face on, in the constellation Canes Venatici.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The phenomenon leads to the matter being blasted out into the interstellar medium from NGC 5195, which is in the process of merging with its larger neighbor NGC 5194, also called the Whirlpool Galaxy.
In making this new discovery, NASA looked into the Chandra X-ray Observatory's new data from a nearby galaxy NGC 5195, which is now merging with its companion galaxy NGC 5194, also known as "The Whirlpool.
If it's the pair then NGC 5194 is sometimes referred to as "M51A", with NGC 5195 separately known as "M51B".
The galaxy is officially named Messier 51 (M51) or NGC 5194, but often goes by its nickname of the "Whirlpool Galaxy.
Thus the designation M51 belongs not only to the magnificent spiral, NGC 5194, but also to its interacting companion, NGC 5195.
NGC 5194 is a small, fairly bright, 6'-long oval with a small bright core, while NGC 5195 is about one-fifth as large, round, and holds a tiny, intense heart.
This image of the core of NGC 5194, the larger of two interacting galaxies called the Whirlpool, for the first time provides an X-ray portrait of a rare, so-called 1C supernova (box).
NGC 5195 is a small galaxy that is currently merging with the larger spiral galaxy NGC 5194 -- better known as "the Whirlpool.
THE WHIRLPOOL GALAXY, M51 OR NGC 5194, was the first to show astronomers spiral structure (see page 116), and it remains one of the closest, best-studied examples of a spiral galaxy.
Also known as NGC 5194, M51 is a popular deep-sky showpiece, and more than a dozen observers independently discovered the outburst.