Eagle nebula

(redirected from NGC 6611)

Eagle nebula

(M16; NGC 6611) A large emission nebula – an H II region – that is located about 2.5 kiloparsecs away in the direction of the constellation Serpens Cauda (see Serpens). It contains some hot young stars that are part of an open cluster.

Eagle Nebula

[′ē·gəl ′neb·yə·lə]
(astronomy)
A large emission nebula in the constellation Serpens, about 2500 parsecs away.
References in periodicals archive ?
The jutting structures, along with the nearby star cluster, NGC 6611, are parts of a star formation region called the Eagle Nebula, also known as Messier 16 or M16.
MUSE has shown that the tip of the left pillar is facing us, atop a pillar that is actually situated behind NGC 6611, unlike the other pillars.
Astronomers hope to better understand how young O and B stars like those in NGC 6611 influence the formation of subsequent stars.
NGC 6611, perhaps better known as the Eagle Nebula, is situated on the eastern edge of Serpens Cauda and very close to the western border of Scutum.
Located 7000 light-years away, towards the constellation of Serpens (the Snake), the Eagle Nebula is a dazzling stellar nursery, a region of gas and dust where young stars are currently being formed and where a cluster of massive, hot stars, NGC 6611, has just been born.
The "Pillars of Creation" are in the middle of the image, with the cluster of young stars, NGC 6611, lying above and to the right.
Ranging from three to eight times the mass of the sun, these stars belng to a Milky Way cluster known as NGC 6611.
The team also finds evidence that some members of cluster NGC 6611, known as Be and Ae stars, are much younger than believed.