NGIO


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NGIO

(Next Generation Input Output) An input/output architecture developed by Intel that evolved into InfiniBand. NGIO was expected to replace the PCI bus with a switching matrix, providing a 2.5 Gbps data path between each pair of nodes. In 2000, NGIO and Future I/O merged into one technology, originally called "System I/O" and later "InfiniBand." See InfiniBand.
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In addition to advancing the ovarian cancer program, NGIO plans to advance Kiromic's proprietary CAR-T and CAR NK technologies into proof of concept clinical trials.
The result of the compromise is that systems will not now appear until the 2001 timeframe - more FIO's timescale than NGIO's, which was originally talking about systems by next year.
"NGIO requires only four wires to connect and is scalable from small systems up to the Enterprise," Andres continued.
One of the main reasons that Future I/O members (spearheaded by Compaq Computer Corp, Hewlett-Packard Co) have criticized Intel's NGIO specification is because they say it's too slow and won't provide enough bandwidth for next generation applications.
Mitch Shultz, Intel's director of server platform marketing, admitted that NGIO isn't based on IP but he denied that that meant the I/O traffic couldn't be transported over an IP-based network, like the internet.
Maly said he'd only seen what's so far been made publicly available on Intel's NGIO spec, but that he believes that it's not based on IP.
Meanwhile, Intel along with Sun Microsystems Inc, Hitachi Corp, Siemens AG and Dell Computer Corp are pushing the NGIO spec, which has some 45 companies lined up behind it.
The divisions have led to the point where Intel has gone its way, and developed its version of the spec, called NGIO (Next Generation Input/Output) while IBM and its partners have developed an alternative architecture, called Future I/O.
After continued wranglings with Intel Corp, whose working on a rival spec, NGIO (Next Generation Input/Output), last week, the alliance took the opportunity to clearly reiterate its goal, namely to provide, for an annual license fee, a single interconnect bus that can be used for both inter-processor communication in parallel application clusters as well as for high bandwidth technologies such as SCSI, Fibre Channel and Gigabit Ethernet in servers.
The forum marked the first opportunity that IBM and it partners have had to substantiate their claims that Future I/O offers vendors the ability to differentiate their products in a way that the rival specification, NGIO (Next Generation Input/Output) from Intel Corp, can't.
Future I/O was announced in January as a rival to Intel Corp's own I/O specification NGIO (Next Generation Input/Output).
Intel, alongwith a series of partners, has already proposed its own future I/O spec, called NGIO (Next Generation Input/Output), but IBM and its partners believe the chip giant's architecture is designed to suppress innovation.