Nicaea

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Nicaea

(nīsē`ə), city of Bithnyia, N Asia Minor, built in the 4th cent. B.C. by Antigonus I as Antigonia and renamed Nicaea by Lysimachus for his wife. It flourished under the Romans. It was the scene of the ecumenical council called in A.D. 325 by Constantine IConstantine I
or Constantine the Great
, 288?–337, Roman emperor, b. Naissus (present-day Niš, Serbia). He was the son of Constantius I and Helena and was named in full Flavius Valerius Constantinus.
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, and a second council held there in 787 sanctioned the devotional use of images (see Nicaea, First Council ofNicaea, First Council of,
325, 1st ecumenical council, convened by Roman Emperor Constantine the Great to solve the problems raised by Arianism. It has been said that 318 persons attended, but a more likely number is 225, including every Eastern bishop of importance, four
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 and Nicaea, Second Council ofNicaea, Second Council of,
787, 7th ecumenical council, convened by Byzantine Empress Irene. Called to refute iconoclasm, the council declared that images ought to be venerated (but not worshiped) and ordered them restored in churches.
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). The city, captured by the Turks in 1078 and by the Crusaders in 1097 (see also Nicaea, empire ofNicaea, empire of,
1204–61. In 1204 the armies of the Fourth Crusade set up the Latin Empire of Constantinople, but the Crusaders' influence did not extend over the entire Byzantine Empire.
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), passed finally to the Turks in 1330. It is sometimes called Nice. The modern İznik, Turkey, is on the site.
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Nicaea

an ancient city in NW Asia Minor, in Bithynia: site of the first council of Nicaea (325 ad), which composed the Nicene Creed
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The consultation observed among other things that (1) the proposal of a universal calendar (including the interruption of seven-day weeks) is not acceptable and is a different question from that of a common date for Easter; (2) the historical context in which Christians live has changed since Nicea, and for Christians in the southem hemisphere Easter is not connected with spring (the vernal equinox in the north is the autumnal equinox in the south); (3) proposals to celebrate Easter on the historical date of Jesus' resurrection are confronted by the problem that historians are not sure of the exact date.
En el contexto de esta insistencia en que la autentica fe se profesa y no se elabora, Atanasio reconoce que los padres de Nicea observaron una importante distincion:
En efecto, aqui encontramos una diferencia sustancial con Nicea que resulta de gran importancia en tanto que se va a repetir en los principales sinodos postconstantinianos: la cuestion que origina la convocatoria del concilio deja de ser de indole doctrinal para centrarse en problemas de caracter disciplinario donde una autoridad civil asume, por lo general, la direccion del evento, si bien son los obispos quienes se encargan de pronunciar la sentencia pertinente.
The classic statements from the fourth and fifth centuries (Nicea, the Cappadocian's terminology for Trinity, Chalcedon) used onto-logical categories.
How can one argue, having met him, that a) he was a "special theory" cooked up by the Council of Nicea, and b) that all religions have a saviour.
There are a very few errors of fact, the most significant being the attribution of homoiousios to Nicea (21) rather than the key word homoousios.
He also convened the Council of Nicea to draft the Christian creed.
Contributing to the recent scholarly interest in the development of Christian doctrine, Ferguson (Anglican studies, Claremont School of Theology) explores the changing ideas about the 325 Council of Nicea, particularly the move away from the traditional emphasis on the Arian heresy and the bonding the church to the Roman Empire under the direction of Constantine.
In the first Council of Nicea, 315, it was stated that women deacons were not ordained and were to be counted among the laity.
This condemnation stemmed from three sources: (1) the "Scriptural Pillar" of prohibitions of usury in the Hebrew Scriptures (18); (2) the "Philosophical Pillar" of Greco-Roman contempt for the practice of usury that drew upon the view of Plato and Aristotle that money is "barren" (22); and (3) the "Historical Pillar" of Christian thought from the church fathers such as Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian, Cyprian, Cyril of Jerusalem, Ambrose, Jerome, and Augustine as well as church councils--including Elvira (306), Nicea (325), Laodicea (364), the Third and Fourth Lateran Councils (1179 and 1215), and Vienna (1311) (30-34).