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nm

Symbol for nanometer, i.e. 10–9 meter.

New Mexico State Information

Phone: (505) 476-2200
www.state.nm.us


Area (sq mi):: 121589.48 (land 121355.53; water 233.96) Population per square mile: 15.90
Population 2005: 1,928,384 State rank: 0 Population change: 2000-20005 6.00%; 1990-2000 20.10% Population 2000: 1,819,046 (White 44.70%; Black or African American 1.90%; Hispanic or Latino 42.10%; Asian 1.10%; Other 30.20%). Foreign born: 8.20%. Median age: 34.60
Income 2000: per capita $17,261; median household $34,133; Population below poverty level: 18.40% Personal per capita income (2000-2003): $22,135-$24,995
Unemployment (2004): 5.70% Unemployment change (from 2000): 0.70% Median travel time to work: 21.90 minutes Working outside county of residence: 15.40%

List of New Mexico counties:

  • Bernalillo County
  • Catron County
  • Chaves County
  • Cibola County
  • Colfax County
  • Curry County
  • De Baca County
  • Do±a Ana County
  • Eddy County
  • Grant County
  • Guadalupe County
  • Harding County
  • Hidalgo County
  • Lea County
  • Lincoln County
  • Los Alamos County
  • Luna County
  • McKinley County
  • Mora County
  • Otero County
  • Quay County
  • Rio Arriba County
  • Roosevelt County
  • San Juan County
  • San Miguel County
  • Sandoval County
  • Santa Fe County
  • Sierra County
  • Socorro County
  • Taos County
  • Torrance County
  • Union County
  • Valencia County
  • New Mexico Parks

    nanometer

    A unit of length used to express wavelengths of light in and near the visible spectrum; 1 nanometer equals 10-9 meter or 10 angstroms. Abbr.nm.

    nanometer

    One billionth of a meter. Nanometers are used to measure the wavelengths of light. See angstrom and metric system.
    References in periodicals archive ?
    One potential concern in assessing these improvements is whether NMES is being inappropriately credited for improvement that is simply the result of the action of intact muscle groups.
    This literature search did reveal other notable studies with results on the use of NMES. These studies were not included due to unreported pretreatment data.
    All four studies used different equipment and settings for NMES. There was also considerable variation in the adjunct modalities, including constraint-induced movement therapy in one case and ayurvedic treatment in another.
    Further complicating this picture is the specific intervention of nerve transfer surgery that one patient received, raising ambiguity about the individual effect of the surgery versus the subsequent NMES. The discrepancy between the reported MRC score for shoulder flexion and AROM in one of the cases also raises the issue of artifacts in reporting as a limitation.
    These results indicate that there is mixed evidence that NMES is associated with improvement in muscle strength.
    Once completed the two experimental sessions, 8 patients declared having preferred the multipath NMES modality, 1 patient declared having preferred the conventional NMES modality, and 3 patients had no preference.
    The acute application of both multipath and conventional NMES was feasible with good tolerance in obese patients with OSA and visible evoked quadriceps muscle contractions in half of them.
    There are limitations to NMES implementation in obese patients directly related to their body composition.
    It is not surprising however that not all the patients were able to reach high NMES current intensities during a single session [28].
    Until now, excessive amounts of subcutaneous adipose tissue have been considered as a physiological barrier affecting the potential effectiveness of NMES therapy in obese patients.