nomad


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nomad

(nō`măd'), one of a group of people without fixed habitation, especially pastoralists. (Some authorities prefer the terms "nonsedentary" or "migratory" rather than "nomadic" to describe mobile hunter-gatherers.) Wandering herders living in tents still occupy sections of Asia, and the hunting groups of the Far North, including the Eskimo, still predominate in much of the arctic and subarctic regions; parts of Africa and Australia are also peopled with nomadic groups. Although nomadism has been a way of life for many groups, it is on the decline. Besides the herders and the hunters and fishers, there are nomadic groups that move about in search of seasonal wild plants as food (such as the camass bulb formerly sought by the Native Americans of the Pacific Northwest and the wild rice gathered in the Great Lakes region). Peoples who move seasonally but have permanent homes for part of the year are said to be seminomadic; there have been seminomadic peoples of various types throughout history. The term semisedentary is applied to traditional populations who practice slash-and-burn agriculture in tropical forest clearings and are forced to move their villages periodically due to the soil exhaustion. Nomadic groups are generally organized in tribal units, and usually the adult males are closely knit into war bands in order to establish territorial rights over the area within which a group migrates. The incursions of nomads into settled civilizations marked the early history of ancient Egypt and Babylonia and reached their height with the great Mongol invasions of W Asia and Europe in the 13th, 14th, and early 15th cent., notably under Jenghiz KhanJenghiz Khan
or Genghis Khan
, Mongolian Chinggis Khaan, 1167?–1227, Mongol conqueror, originally named Temujin. He succeeded his father, Yekusai, as chieftain of a Mongol tribe and then fought to become ruler of a Mongol confederacy.
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 and TimurTimur
or Tamerlane
, c.1336–1405, Mongol conqueror, b. Kesh, near Samarkand. He is also called Timur Leng [Timur the lame]. He was the son of a tribal leader, and he claimed (apparently for the first time in 1370) to be a descendant of Jenghiz Khan.
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. Formerly efforts were made to generalize about nomads and find a common denominator among such diverse cultures as those of the North American Plains tribes, the BedouinBedouin
[Arab.,=desert dwellers], primarily nomad Arab peoples of the Middle East, where they form about 10% of the population. They are of the same Semitic stock as their sedentary neighbors (the fellahin; see Arabs) and share with them a devout belief in Islam and a distrust
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 of Arabia, and the RomaniRomani
or Romany
, people known historically in English as Gypsies and their language.

1 A traditionally nomadic people with particular folkways and a unique language, found on every continent; they are sometimes also called Roma, from the name of a major
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 (Gypsies), but these have largely been abandoned in favor of studying each culture as a unit. Even the idea that nomadism represents a transition from the Neolithic hunter to the sedentary farmer is not accepted as valid. There are instances of peoples who have abandoned farming and have become nomads, e.g., those Native Americans of the Great Plains who forsook their farms to hunt bison, after the horse had been introduced.
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NOMAD

[′nō‚mad]
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

nomad

a member of a people or tribe who move from place to place to find pasture and food
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

NOMAD

(language, database)
A database language.

Version: NOMAD2 from Must Software International.

["NOMAD Reference Manual", Form 1004, National CSS Inc, Dec 1976].
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

NOMAD

A relational DBMS for IBM mainframes, PCs and VAXes from Select Business Solutions, Trumbull, CT (www.selectbs.com). Introduced in the mid-1970s, it was one of the first database systems to provide a non-procedural language for data manipulation. NOMAD can also access data on Oracle, Sybase, DB2 and other databases. Former corporate owners of NOMAD include Thomson Software and the Gores Technology Group.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
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The USB-A to Lightning cable on Nomad's new accessory also supports pass-through charging.
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She said Nomad worked to address social issues in the empowerment of Women and Youth, mostly from under-privileged communities under its 'Art for Social Change, Activism and Peace' programmes focusing on Human Rights and Women's Rights through awareness-raising and economic empowerment, training, seminars and workshops, working in a holistic manner which made the Gallery a unique entity in the whole country.
At the Nomad Marketplace, one could see stalls of homemade items, organic vegetables and fruit were crowded by customers.
The deal strengthens links between Nomad and both Hitachi and Abellio ScotRail.
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If you like a straightforward fixed-blade able to deliver a high level of self-defense and perform a bevy of camp chores, the Desert Nomad will be glad to be your friend.
A total of 330 nomad children are getting free education at 11 literacy centres established across the division.