Notes


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Notes

This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Notes

 

(1) Conventional graphic signs which, together with auxiliary instructions, are used to represent music on a system of lines (that is, on a staff). Historically, each system of notation has been associated with a particular set of notes distinguished by their form and names.

In modern notation, which is in international use, the circular or oval head is the basic component of a note. Both filled-in (black) heads and hollow (white) heads are used. A stem (vertical line) may be attached to the right side of the head and pointing upward or to the left side and pointing downward. The end of the stem may form a flag, which may be single, double, triple, and so forth. Instead of forming flags, the tips of the stems may be joined by transverse ribs, or cross strokes, which may be single or may occur in pairs, in threes, and so on. The position of the head on the staff, together with the key designated at the beginning of the staff, determines the pitch of a note. The type of head, presence or lack of a stem, and presence and type of flag determine the duration of a note.

(2) Sheets, notebooks, and entire volumes of musical works in manuscript or print.

V. A. VAKHROMEEV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Evernote

A popular notetaking application from Evernote Corporation, Redwood City, CA (www.evernote.com) that lets users create notes that are synchronized on all their computers and mobile devices. Introduced in 2008, Web pages, photos and attached files can also be stored in the user's computer or in the Evernote cloud.

Evernote Business provides a sharable notetaking system for managing projects, and the Spaces feature keeps team members up-to-date. Evernote Business maintains continuity as teams evolve and also restores previous versions of notes. In addition, integration with Slack is provided. See Slack.

IBM Notes

Messaging and groupware software from HCL (in 2018, HCL acquired Notes from IBM). Originally Lotus Notes and introduced in 1989 for OS/2, it was later expanded to Windows, Mac, Unix, NetWare, AS/400 and S/390. Notes provides email, document sharing, workflow, group discussions and calendaring and scheduling. It also accepts plug-ins for other functions. In 2012, Lotus Notes was officially renamed IBM Notes.

The heart of Notes, and what makes it different from other groupware, is its document database. Everything, including mail and group discussions, are maintained in a Notes database, which can hold data fields, text, audio and video.

Synchronized Distributed Databases
Notes provides strong replication capability, which synchronizes databases distributed in multiple locations and to mobile users. The Notes Name & Address Book provides a central directory for all resources. Many applications have been built with Notes using its macro language and LotusScript, a Visual Basic-like programming language.

Notes Domino
In 1996, the Notes client was decoupled from the Notes server, which was renamed Domino. Notes Domino is Internet compliant and can be accessed by a Web browser, converting Notes database contents into HTML pages on the fly. The Notes client also contains a browser, which can download Web pages and maintain them as Notes documents.

The Father of Groupware
Notes is often considered the father of groupware, because it was the first to popularize a development environment around collaboration.


The Notes Client
The Notes interface can be customized according to users' individual needs. The square blocks are the databases which are organized by the tabs. The "Workspace at" on the title bar (top left) indicates the location of the user for synchronization purposes. (Screen shot courtesy of Lotus Development Corporation.)

Lotus Notes

Messaging and groupware software from IBM Lotus that was introduced in 1989 for OS/2 and later expanded to Windows, Mac, Unix, NetWare, AS/400 and S/390. Notes provides email, document sharing, workflow, group discussions and calendaring and scheduling. It also accepts plug-ins for other functions.

The heart of Notes, and what makes it different from other groupware, is its document database. Everything, including mail and group discussions, are maintained in a Notes database, which can hold data fields, text, audio and video.

Synchronized Distributed Databases
Notes provides strong replication capability, which synchronizes databases distributed in multiple locations and to mobile users. The Notes Name & Address Book provides a central directory for all resources. Many applications have been built with Notes using its macro language and LotusScript, a Visual Basic-like programming language.

Notes Server Became Domino
In 1996, the Notes client was decoupled from the Notes server, which was renamed Domino. Domino is Internet compliant and can be accessed by a Web browser, converting Notes database contents into HTML pages on the fly. The Notes client also contains a browser, which can download Web pages and maintain them as Notes documents.

The Father of Groupware
Notes is often considered the father of groupware, because it was the first to popularize a development environment around groupware functions.


The Notes Client
The Notes interface can be customized according to users' individual needs. The square blocks are the databases which are organized by the tabs. The "Workspace at" on the title bar (top left) indicates the location of the user for synchronization purposes. (Screen shot courtesy of Lotus Development Corporation.)

OneNote

A personal information manager from Microsoft for organizing information and ad hoc note taking. It is commonly used for classroom and research projects by providing the electronic equivalent of a three-ring binder that holds text, handwritten notes and other elements. Introduced in 2003, OneNote integrates with Outlook and other Microsoft Office applications. See Microsoft Office.
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References in classic literature ?
Farce notes like those which had so much astounded them the month before.
Giry took the envelope with the twenty notes inside it and made for the door.
When you were saying good-bye to her at the door, while you held her hand in one hand, with the other, the left, you slipped the note into her pocket.
Note an interesting incident or two for citation in class.
When, however, we returned to Switzerland towards the end of June, and he found himself once more in the familiar and exhilarating air of the mountains, all his joyous creative powers revived, and in a note to me announcing the dispatch of some manuscript, he wrote as follows: "I have engaged a place here for three months: forsooth, I am the greatest fool to allow my courage to be sapped from me by the climate of Italy.
[To the note taker] Really, sir, if you are a detective, you need not begin protecting me against molestation by young women until I ask you.
"You cannot think I mean to hurry you," said he, in an undervoice, perceiving the amazing trepidation with which she made up the note, "you cannot think I have any such object.
Have you a memorandum of the number of that five-hundred pound note you paid away in France?"
In this letter there was a little note enclosed for Rosa.
But, as he afterwards admitted, he thought it was merely a note from some other girl, of such trifling sort as school-girls are wont to write; and moreover, he had already committed himself to the decree, which, like those of Mede and Persian, must not alter.
And haven't you a note from my uncle Moss for three hundred pounds?
At one time the count thought of giving her the Ryazan estate or of selling a forest, at another time of borrowing money on a note of hand.