NSFnet


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NSFNET

NSFnet

(National Science Foundation NETwork) The network funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, which linked five supercomputer sites across the country in the mid-1980s. Universities were also allowed to connect to it. In 1988, it was upgraded from its original 56 Kbps lines to T1 circuits. By the early 1990s, NSFnet was using a T3 backbone and served as the primary Internet backbone until 1995, when the Net became commercialized. See ARPAnet.
References in periodicals archive ?
Entre 1989 y 1994 America Latina ya estaba conectada por TCP/IP (Internet) con NSFNET (National Science Foundation Network) (Dholakia, et al.
As TCP/IP was being developed and ARPANET and NSFNET were growing, someone had to be managing the existing networks.
In conjunction with this legislative change, in 1992, NSFNET began
We show the 2-hop away SD pair case for the Ring topology in Fig 14, the 2-hop away SD pair case for the NSFNET topology in Fig 15.
235) The civilian network that later superseded it, NSFNet, was also federally funded and overseen.
For example, traffic originating on one campus network would have to connect to the regional network with which it was associated, which handed off the traffic to the NSFNET backbone, which in turn handed it off to the regional network that served the destination campus network.
National Science Foundation (NSF) opened internet networks between universities called NSFNet.
In the 1980s, as the Internet was opened to academic and research institutions, and the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded the NSFNET as an Internet backbone.
In the 1980s, as the Internet was opened to academic and research institutions, the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded the NSFNET as an Internet backbone.
Our hypothesis is that the deployment of NSFNET and its connection to networks in Europe and Asia in the late 1980s are responsible for this change.