NUMA-Q

NUMA-Q

A family of Intel-based servers from IBM that use a non-uniform memory access architecture (NUMA). The NUMA-Q line was developed by Sequent Computer Systems, which IBM acquired in 1999. See NUMA.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sequent Computer Systems says that the price/performance of its NUMA-Q 1000 and NUMA-Q 2000 Unix server lines has improved by 50% after the introduction of new Intel Pentium III Xeon-based systems, combined with its new competitive prices.
"We have partnered closely with Fundamental to bring this IBM environment to NUMA-Q."
"FLEX-ES running on Sequent NUMA-Q servers represents the new data center option for running S/390 cycles, with an important role to play in data center migration, consolidation, and Y2K compliance."
Compaq Computer Corp says it isn't worried by the IBM Corp- Sequent Computer Systems Inc merger earlier this week as the performance of its own version of NUMA technology, code-named PUMA (Practically Uniform Memory Access) leaves Sequent's NUMA-Q standing.
Those figures compare to a local memory latency of around 180 nanoseconds for Sequent's NUMA-Q systems.
The NUMA-Q 1000 series, which consists of servers based on either four or eight of Intel's Pentium II Xeon processors, runs on the Unix system but can also be re- deployed to run on Microsoft's Windows NT system.
The company has been telling Wall Street that its new mid-range NUMA-Q 1000 server has made it more competitive with Sun Microsystems Inc.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-(C) 1994-8 M2 COMMUNICATIONS LTD Sequent Computer Systems Inc has launched its second- generation NUMA-Q 2000 data centre servers.
The NUMA-Q 2000 servers with Pentium II Xeon processors are available immediately with prices starting at US$200,000.
Sequent Computer Systems Inc duly unveiled its new 'Scorpion' mid-range eight-way Unix servers as the NUMA-Q 1000 line, hoping the new configurations will cut it a new high-volume revenue stream from sales of systems which cost less than $1m (CI No 3,460).
Its 64-way Intel Xeon-based NUMA-Q 2000 achieved a power throughput performance of 27,441 at $756.
At triple the current performance, IBM should be able to push the Condors to over 100,000 TPM on the TPC-C online transaction processing benchmark test, which puts Condor in the same power class as the fastest Sun Starfires, HP V2500s and Sequent NUMA-Qs.