N-way

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N-way

An Ethernet switch capability that automatically detects the speed and type of transmission on each port and adjusts the switch to accommodate it (10 Mbps, 100 Mbps, 1 Gbps; half or full duplex). All modern Ethernet switches are N-way. N-way functionality was first developed by National Semiconductor in 1994.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yesterday, Su Su Nway, having served nine months and been released, was arrested again, along with two associates, for seeking to post anti-government leaflets.
NWay autonegotiation determines transmission speed and creates independent 10 Mb and 100 Mb segments.
8) The instantaneous bandwidth was also limited to approximately 20 percent, exemplifying the tendency for large Nway combiners to have less bandwidth than other possible circuits.
Our team here at nWay has worked with a wide-range of different consoles and platforms," said Taehoon Kim, co-founder and CEO at nWay.
US developer nWay signed up with Korean powerhouse CJ E&M - specifically its gaming arm - CJ E&M Netmarble.
802,3 NWAY negociacion automatica, modo duplex y control de flujo, soporta control de flujo IEEE802.
ried the his me in His dad Pete Co C nway said at the time he Conway said at the time he was delighted to see his son settle down.
Representatives of National publicly announced that, if NWay technology was chosen, National would license NWay to any requesting party for a one-time fee of $1000.
nway at on that willing "What we need now is to have a debate about capacity based around facts and evidence.
In a press briefing at the Yangon Airport on Thursday evening, Pinheiro said he had visited Insein Prison Thursday afternoon and met some political prisoners, including 78-year-old former opposition leader Win Tin who has been in jail for over 18 years, labor activist Su Su Nway who was arrested Tuesday during his visit, and former student leader Min Zeyar, arrested in August this year.
The current Nway switch is a Fast Ethernet connection.
We recognize women like Su Su Nway, a labor activist jailed for participating in September's "Saffron Revolution"; Nilar Thein, forced to leave her newborn child to hide from military persecutors; and the more than 100 brave dissidents still missing or imprisoned because they chose to raise their voices.