Nabokov


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Nabokov

Vladimir Vladimirovich . 1899--1977, US novelist, born in Russia. His works include Lolita (1955), Pnin (1957), Pale Fire (1962), and Ada (1969)
References in periodicals archive ?
Nabokov's Mimicry of Freud is not the first work to approach the thorny subject of Nabokov and Freud, but the initial impression given is of a revisionist reading.
He added:"Basically, nobody has looked before in depth at the literary and ethical side of Nabokov's writing.
This may explain the reduction of "the pleasure of art" and the "pleasures of a spiritual order" when M'sieur Pierre compares them to the lust for "some piquant torso" (Nabokov 1959: 154).
Things slowly soured between Wilson and Nabokov. The Russian took umbrage over the fact that Wilson, America's pre-eminent critic, rarely reviewed his books, and Beam suggests that for the most part Wilson did not like Nabokov's fiction.
A justificativa de Appel (NABOKOV, 1991: 388-389 e 450-451) e a de que se trata da primeira paisagem enfaticamente povoada de Lolita, e sua beleza se deve mais a mistura de sons humanos, que se diferenciam momentaneamente uns dos outros para depois retornar a massa sonora, do que a natureza que era comumente seu foco, por exemplo nas vistas das montanhas e demais paisagens de beira de estrada durante suas viagens.
The purpose of my study is not to discuss the peculiarities of Nabokov's Nikolai Gogol, but to identify echoes of Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy in it.
Our contention in the present study is that this is the case of the Divided Self metaphor in (at least) two of Nabokov's poems.
This approach indeed characterizes the essay I chose as the winner--and, though the choice was not an easy one, "Sebald's Apparitional Nabokov" proved a truly thrilling read: despite its complexity, I could not put it down.
Writing with insight and originality about authors as demanding as Marcel Proust, Virginia Woolf and Vladimir Nabokov, whose works have attracted such vast quantities of critical analysis and commentary, extends the challenge yet further still.
In his opening image, then, Nabokov grants us entry into the complex figure through which he conceives of consciousness: it is as a motion picture show that life is lived, a brief intermission of light, sound and movement that for a short while relieves the darkness of the cosmic auditorium.
The term involution is most commonly used in connection with Nabokov's work, but Ksiezopolska (English literature, American Studies Center, U.