Nabokov


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Nabokov

Vladimir Vladimirovich . 1899--1977, US novelist, born in Russia. His works include Lolita (1955), Pnin (1957), Pale Fire (1962), and Ada (1969)
References in periodicals archive ?
Bozovic's thought-provoking take on Nabokov's late writings at the intersection of several literary and cultural studies fields will undoubtedly prod Nabokov scholars and lay readers alike to revisit their oft-dismissive attitudes toward the post-Pale Fire stage in the author's career.
Such people, Nabokov believes, are obsessed with their immediate material surroundings and in consequence they are relegated to a soulless existence which tragically calls them "transparent.
Wilson was upfront in telling Nabokov that he did not like Lolita, and he may have been a bit dismayed by its extraordinary reception, especially because his own "sex" novel, Memoirs of Hecate County, failed to spark a similar response among critics or readers.
En Opiniones contundentes Nabokov decia que le avergonzaba un poco que nadie hubiera entendido Cosas transparentes.
In creating a narrative that defies the expectations of the genre it purports to represent, Nabokov relied on Sterne's unorthodox, digressive, and self-referential novel to both frame his own narrative and to package Gogol for English-language readership.
To continue the comparison: Nabokov and Mailer were both battlers, each in his own way.
In this context, the analytical proposal made in the present paper offers a plausible interpretation of how Nabokov has faced the task of constructing two poems, perhaps only in an intuitive way.
The apparitional Nabokov is that other who migrates into Sebald's text to "tear" and "perturb" it, but the text does not repudiate him as a holdover from a superseded past, engaging him instead as a figure of discontinuity and migration, relevant to the present.
Hagglund's chapter on Nabokov offers an account of the novelist's extraordinary handling of time in Ada, with supporting references to The Gift, Pale Fire and Speak, Memory.
As the early movie camera pans through space, it thus also produces a transfiguring effect on time, giving the young Nabokov access to lifelike moving images of what, for him, is a prehistorial world.
And though movingly described in everyday terms that were to haunt Nabokov through a lifetime, the reality of a way of life that his memoir was able to evoke was furthermore enhanced metaphorically by a more profound and pervasive feeling of loss, all the more acute when faced with the intensity of remembrance, a remembrance all the more painful because "the kind of Russian family to which I belonged --[is] a kind now extinct-- .
Yet, The Secret Life of Vladimir Nabokov is a beautifully written, thoroughly researched book that is sure to significantly enrich the stream of Nabokovian studies.