Nagoi

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Nagoi

 

a family of Russian nobles known in Tver’ from the end of the 13th century and in Moscow from the end of the 15th century.

In the 16th and early 17th centuries, nine of the Nagois were boyars. Mariia Fedorovna Nagaia, who died in 1612, became the seventh wife of Ivan IV the Terrible in 1581 and was the mother of Tsarevich Dmitrii Ivanovich. After Dmitrii’s death she entered a convent under the name of Marfa. In 1605 she “recognized” the First False Dmitrii to be her own son, somehow saved by a miracle. The Nagoi family died out in the mid-17th century.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
PESHAWAR -- Malik Amanullah, a member of the peace committee in Bajaur Agency was targeted by terrorists through a remote controlled bomb on Tuesday in Chahar Mang area of Tehsil Nagoi.
PESHAWAR:Malik Amanullah, a member of the peace committee in Bajaur Agency, was targeted in a remote control bomb attack on Tuesday in Chahar Mang area of Tehsil Nagoi. According to sources, Amanullah was severely injured in the explosion and was immediately transferred to the Agency Headquarters Hospital for treatment.
In 1571 Ivan wrote to Fedor Andreevich Pisemskii and Afanasii Fedorovich Nagoi in Crimea that "now you are neither in the 'land' nor in the oprichnina" (este ni v zemskom, ni v oprishnine), but when they returned to Moscow, they would be well received.
The girl was from his first marriage to Eudoxia Nagaya (Nagoi) (49) and at that time about seventeen years old--of marriageable age according to the Russian custom.
The archimandrite ordered them to be arrested and chained and to escort their leader, Ivashka Nagoi (Naked Johnny), to his cell.
He observes that the marginal corrections, which are usually considered to reflect badly on Ivan's Staritskii cousins, also implicitly criticize the Zakhar'in-Iur'ev-Romanovs, the clan of Ivan's first wife and Fedor's mother, and Fedor Nagoi, a relative of Ivan's last wife (the mother of Dmitrii)--an insight he credits to Amosov (257).
Dunning rejects the traditional identification of the pretender as the lecherous defrocked monk Grigorii Otrep'ev and proposes instead that the Nagois, the real Dmitrii's mother's family (the family of Ivan the Terrible's seventh wife) "secretly raised a child to believe he was the Tsarevich in the hope that there would eventually be an opportunity to use him to regain their position at court." Dunning also teases his readers with the possibility that the First False Dmitrii "may have been the real son of Ivan the Terrible," since, according to Dunning, "[t]here is actually some evidence to back up that astonishing claim" (85).