Nahman of Bratslav

Nahman of Bratslav

(näkh`mən, brät`släf), 1772–1810, Jewish Hasidic leader, the great-grandson of the Baal-Shem-TovBaal-Shem-Tov
, c.1698–1760, Jewish founder of modern Hasidism, b. Ukraine. His life is the subject of many tales that circulated even before his death. Originally named Israel ben Eliezer, he is said to have been born of elderly, poor parents and to have been orphaned at
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. His messianic pretensions put him in conflict with other Hasidic (see HasidismHasidism
or Chassidism
[Heb.,=the pious], Jewish religious movement founded in Poland in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov. Its name derives from Hasidim. Hasidism, which stressed the mercy of God and encouraged joyous religious expression through music and dance, spread
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) leaders. Nahman differed from other Hasidim by his consciousness of God's absence from the world, and his concern about sin. He told stories to convey the struggle against evil and for redemption. After his death, his followers did not choose a new leader, but continue to revere him to this day.

Bibliography

See his tales, tr. and ed. by A. Band (1980); biography by A. Green (1979).

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References in periodicals archive ?
Nahman of Bratslav, hagiography with footnotes: edifying tales and the writing of history in Hasidism, from prophetess to madwoman: the displacement of female spirituality in the post-Sabbatian era, on women in Hasidism: S.
203-224 (focusing on Jeremiah 31:15-16 and selections from Tan huma, Saadia Gaon, Jacob Emden, Nahman of Bratslav, and Mordecai Kaplan)
the translation of Arthur Green, Tormented Master, A Life of Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav, (Alabama: The University of Alabama Press, 1979), 200-201; see also his The Zaddik as Axis Mundi in Later Judaism, Journal of American Academy of Religion, vol.
The others include commentaries: Nahman of Bratslav: The Tales by Arnold Band (Paulist Press, 1978) focuses more on literary themes and images, while Tales of Rabbi Nachman by Martin Buber (Prometheus Books, 1999) is a modern retelling with thoughts on psychology and symbolism.
(81) Rabbi Nachman of Bratslav, quoted in Arthur Green, Tormented Master: The Life and Spiritual Quest of Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav, Jewish Lights Publications, 1992, p.
Intertextuality in the tales of Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav; a close reading of Sippurey Ma'asiyot.
Who else but Leviant could combine Reb Nahman of Bratslav and Beethoven (e.g., in his [Leviant's] novel The Man Who Thought He Was Messiah), Bach and "The Book Bahir," the "Sefer Yetzirah" and Bartok?
They are, first, the leading maskil (enlightener) Naftali Hertz Wessely (1725-1805) who lived in the northern trading cities: Hamburg, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, and Berlin and, second, the Hasidic mystic, Nahman of Bratslav (1772-1810), who spent most of his days, except for a journey to Palestine in 1798-99, in relative small market towns in the Ukraine.
This is the essence of devotional repentance in the thought of the early nineteenth-century Hasidic master Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav. We repent, Rabbi Nahman teaches, not to eradicate sin but to bring us to a new level of clarity, after which we have to repent on the deficiency of our first repentance.
They are the illustrated Hasidic Lurianic prayer book; the Kiddish cup of the Maggid Dov Ber of Miedzyrzecz; the Ruzhin Passover Seder plate; the Lelov Sabbath lamp the Hasidic </Atara/< (prayer shawl ornament); </lyulke/> (long-stemmed pipes) and snuffboxes; </shmire/> (protective talismans); and the chair of Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav. ([umlaut] Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
Tormented Master." The Life and Spiritual Quest of Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav. Jewish Lights Publications, 1992.
They concern themselves with religious themes and issues, in sharp contrast to Sholem Aleichem's lack of attraction to "the Bible, the midrashim, the medieval romance, the stories of Nahman of Bratslav, and of Shivhei Ha-Besht [Praises of the Baal-Shem-Tov]."(33) Wiesel focuses on this type of material, retelling Hasidic and Biblical tales.