Nakian, Reuben

Nakian, Reuben

(näk`yän), 1897–1986, American sculptor, b. College Point, New York. Nakian's work is characterized by bold, massive, rough-textured forms organically draped or leaning heavily against one another. Most are abstract portrayals of themes from classical mythology. The monumental Rape of Lucrece (1955–58; Mus. of Modern Art, New York City) is made of welded steel sheets and rods. Nakian's works are noted for their spontaneous sensuality.
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Nakian, Reuben

(1897–1986) sculptor; born in Long Island, N.Y. He studied at the Art Students League (1912), was an apprentice to Paul Manship (1916), shared a studio with Gaston Lachaise (1920–23), then moved to Stamford, Conn. (1944). He specialized in animal and heroic subjects, and later, expressionistic sculptures, such as The Dance of Death (1967).
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.