Named Pipes

Named Pipes

An IPC facility in LAN Manager that allows data to be exchanged from one application to another either over a network or running within the same computer. The use of the term pipes for interprocess communication was coined in Unix.
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It supports the interprocess communications (IPC) based on the named pipes.
It creates a verifiable audit trail of all transactions -- including DBA activities that access databases via "back-door" protocols such as Oracle Bequeath, named pipes and shared memory -- and immediately generates real-time security alerts whenever policy violations are detected.
The new connectivity options allow administrators to connect to a computer using protocol independent named pipes or TCP/IP with Windows log on for that computer.
One article here concentrates on C++ and its many applications in Web database development, such as multithreading and named pipes.
Inter-process communication between Interix/32 applications, Interix/64 applications and Windows applications via shared memory, named pipes, sockets, common files, COM and other IPCs.
With ZOC you can transfer data via modem, telnet connections, named pipes, Unix rlogin, TAPI modems and secure shell (SSH) connections.
The beauty of the named pipes example shown in Figure SB1a and SB1b is that it works among local as well as remote processes just by changing the pipe name, which can be obtained interactively from the user, unlike the scheme shown in the example.
The S-TAP resides on the database server itself, so the back door is monitored, including connections via named pipes or shared memory.
0 process and hosting models, but brings some advantages as support for other protocols besides HTTP, such as TCP and Named pipes.
First solution to monitor all privileged user activities - on any OS, over any protocol, for any supported DBMS - including all "back-door" connections such as Oracle Bequeath, IBM DB2 and Informix shared memory, SQL Server named pipes and Sybase TLI.
For complete visibility, Guardium also captures all privileged user access to databases via "back-door" connections such as local TCP, named pipes and shared memory.
In order to monitor privileged user activity via local-access connections such as local consoles, shared memory, named pipes or Oracle BEQ - or in environments with virtualization or no access to SPAN ports on network switches - it also monitors database traffic on the database sever itself via a lightweight software probe called S-TAP[TM].