Namier


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Namier

Sir Lewis Bernstein, original name Ludwik Bernsztajn vel Niemirowski. 1888--1960, British historian, born in Poland: noted esp for his studies of 18th-century British politics
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(24.) Lewis Namier, The Structure of Politics at the Accession of George III, London: MacMillan, 1929.
(10) Lawton's adversaries, supported by Lewis Namier, who was not a member of the AUC, urged Ukrainians to line up with the Soviet Union, France, and the Little Entente against Nazi Germany (LD 18 and 20 July 1935).
Namier's world was a sordid culture of self-interest and greed, bereft of integrity or principle.
(2) During the 1950s and early 1960s, what passed for English social history was redolent with the elitist parliamentary prosopographies of Lewis Namier. Thompson could hardly have advanced the importance of working-class agency by offering alternative studies of the emerging English bourgeoisie.
Namier suggested some fifty years ago that access to the highest levels of society came from the possession "uncontending ease, the unbought grace of life" (England in the Age of the American Revolution, 2nd ed.
(46.) On whether Hobbes's "new" political science, with its promise of an "everlasting" commonwealth, is undermined by his understanding of international politics, see Haig Patapan, "The Glorious Sovereign: Thomas Hobbes on Leadership and International Relations," in British International Thinkers from Hobbes to Namier, ed.
Even the ostensibly scholarly Josiah Wedgwood was denounced by Lewis Namier (1888-1960) as an incompetent amateur, making his History of Parliament project impossible to begin in earnest until he was safely in his grave.
More troubling, like Collingwood, Skinner was also confronted with the way in which the history of ideas in his discipline was being increasingly marginalised, not by Oxford realists (or, in the case of HET, by orthodox economists), but by a parade of Marxists, Annalists (especially Fernand Braudel) and political realists (such as Lewis Namier) who effectively subordinated the study of the history of ideas (that is, dismissed it as less relevant) to geography or economics or the preferences of powerful political leaders (see Skinner 2002, p.