Nanki-Poo

Nanki-Poo

emperor’s son disguised as a minstrel. [Br. Opera: The Mikado, Magill I, 591–592]

Nanki-Poo

wins Yum-Yum despite his self-exile to defy his father’s commands. [Br. Opera: Gilbert and Sullivan The Mikado]
References in periodicals archive ?
Richard Munday's Nanki-Poo was given here as a slightly mystified stalwart, and carried his love affair off with great alomb.
IT'S a fun, if slightly bizarre night at the theatre in the company of Yum Yum, Ko-Ko and Nanki-Poo.
The production is directed by Martin Lloyd-Evans and the cast includes Richard Suart as Ko-Ko, Nicholas Sharratt as Nanki-Poo, Rebecca Bottone as Yum-Yum and Sioned Gwen Davies as Pitti-Sing.
Nicholas Sharratt as the tragic hero Nanki-Poo has a spectacular voice but his performance was spoiled by an irritating speech impediment, used to give emphasis to the upper-class fool role.
Martin Sadd was a tall and commanding Nanki-Poo, his voice equally so, though perhaps a trifle heavy for the part.
There's also Nanki-Poo, who has disguised himself to escape from ugly noblewoman Katisha.
There's also Nanki-Poo, who has disguised himself to escape from ugly noblewoman Katisha; and Yum-Yum, who happens to be in love with Nanki-Poo.
In Act II, Pooh-Bah is directed by Ko-Ko to officiate at the marriage of Nanki-Poo and Yum-Yum.
Nick Allen and Claire Lees sparkled as the young lovers, Nanki-Poo and Yum-Yum, while Bruce Graham excelled in the role of Poo-Bah, the Lord High Everything Else, and there were outstanding contributions from John Savournin (Pish-Tush) and Sylvia Clarke (Katisha).
She's sought by both Ko-Ko and her truest love, Nanki-poo (Sean Tath O'Donnell).
It tells the story of the Mikado's son, Nanki-Poo (Chris Simmons) travelling incognito to avoid the clutches of Katisha (Angela Griffiths), an oversexed femme fatale.
Played Nanki-Poo in "The Mikado" and Lil' Bat in "Susannah" at Eugene Opera.