nanorobot

nanorobot

A nanoscale robot. "Autonomous" nanorobots have their own nanoscale computers built in, while "insect" nanorobots are deployed in groups and are controlled by a central computer.


Fixing One Cell at a Time
By 2020, scientists at Rutgers University believe that nanorobots will be injected into the bloodstream and administer a drug directly to an infected cell. This nanorobot has a carbon nanotube body, a biomolecular motor that propels it and peptide limbs to orient itself. Because it is composed of biological elements such as DNA and proteins, it will be easily removed from the body. For more information, see http://bionano.rutgers.edu/Mavroidis_Final_Report.pdf. (Image courtesy of the Bio-Nano Robotics team at Rutgers University: Constantinos Mavroidis, Martin L. Yarmush, Atul Dubey, Angela Thornton, Kevin Nikitczuk, Silvina Tomassone, Fotios Papadimitrakopoulos and Bernie Yurke.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Cancer-fighting Nanorobot May Be Able to Target Tumors, Spare Healthy Tissue," by Michelle Castilo.
The DNA nanorobot emulates this level of specificity through the use of modular components in which different hinges and molecular messages can be switched in and out of the underlying delivery system, much as different engines and tires can be placed on the same chassis.
In 2012 Wyss Institute researchers reported in Science that they had built a nanorobot that uses logic to detect a target cell, then reveals an antibody that activates a "suicide switch" in leukemia or lymphoma cells.
3 ( ANI ): Researchers have taken a major step towards building the first nanorobot that would facilitate targeted transport of medications to the diseased cells in the body for faster and more beneficial effect.
This vision of a bionic nanorobot called NANO-Copter is made of a carbon nano-tube, which forms the main body with flexible limbs that are used to move and manipulate objects, and a biomolecular motor located on the head with a propeller of Ni.
It's a DNA nanorobot, a primitive version of the machines that may someday perform tasks too small for humans to do.
Nanomedicine applications include treating cancer and infectious disease, understanding and influencing the aging process, enhancing human intelligence, and sending tiny nanorobot surgeons into a person's body to operate without producing scars.
But, Joy's anxiety is aroused by the next step he envisions after the introduction of nanorobot devices, that of making self-assembling nanorobots--that is, nanorobots that replicate of their own accord, without human intervention, and possibly contrary to human desires (2).
After all, we're not close to building a nanorobot, and perhaps it can't be done.
Therefore the main problems in nanorobotic control are: (i) design of relevant dynamical model of nanorobot motion, (ii) create of the related control algorithm and (iii) measurement at the nanoscale.
Like a regular robot, a nanorobot may be made of many thousands of mechanical parts such as bearings and gears composed of strong diamond-like material.
Although they say the ideal nanomanufacturing environment would enable a human teleoperator to experience even the sounds and smells of the ultra-Lilliputian operations, the Japanese researchers have set their sights for now on a "nanorobot system," which would enable workers to see and feel what the nanorobot is doing on submicron scales.