nanotube

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nanotube

A carbon molecule that resembles a cylinder made out of chicken wire one to two nanometers in diameter by any number of millimeters in length. Accidentally discovered by a Japanese researcher at NEC in 1990 while making Buckyballs, they have potential use in many applications. With a tensile strength 10 times greater than steel at about one quarter the weight, nanotubes are considered the strongest material for their weight known to mankind.

Myriad Applications
Currently used to strengthen plastics and carbon fibers, nanotubes have the potential for making ultra-strong fabrics as well as reinforcing structural materials in buildings, cars and airplanes. In the future, nanotubes may replace silicon in electronic circuits, and prototypes of elementary components have been developed. In 1998, IBM and NEC created nanotube transistors, and three years later, IBM created a NOT gate using two nanotube transistors. Nanotubes are already used as storage cells in Nantero's non-volatile memory chips (see NRAM), and they are expected to be used in the construction of sensors and display screens.

Single Walled and Multiwalled
Single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) use a single sheath of graphite one atom thick, called "graphene." Multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs) are either wrapped into multiple layers like a parchment scroll or are constructed of multiple cylinders, one inside the other. See Buckyball, graphene, nanotechnology and NRAM.


The Chicken Wire Tube
At the molecular level, a single-walled carbon nanotube looks a lot like rolled up chicken wire with hexagonal cells. The number of applications that may ultimately benefit from carbon nanotubes is enormous.
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers planted wheatgrass seeds in multiple replicates in cotton wool and fed them with dispersions that contained raw single-walled or multi-walled nanotubes, purified single-walled nanotubes or iron oxide nanoparticles that mimicked leftover catalyst often attached to nanotubes.
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted huge attention over the past two decades, based on their extraordinary physical and chemical properties that are a result of their intrinsic nano-sized one-dimensional nature.
IN SPITE OF THEIR WELL-KNOWN STRENGTH AND STIFFNESS, NANOTUBES HAVE PROVED INCREDIBLY DIFFICULT TO HARNESS, ESPECIALLY IN COMPOSITES.
Just as fast Internet connections spread computer viruses, tunneling nanotubes can carry dangerous cargo.
We're using an intrinsic property of nanotubes to develop a weapon that kills cancer.
To make the new materials, the researchers deposit a forest of carbon nanotubes across the surface of a cloth woven from fibers of silicon carbide.
AIST has encapsulated beta-carotene in HiPco single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), a type of carbon nanotube currently marketed by Carbon Nanotechnologies Inc.
The addition of nanotubes into the PU is said to have resulted in remarkable reinforcement and toughness improvement simultaneously.
According to Fuhrer, his new findings indicate nanotubes could fill that role.
has begun large-scale production of a material called carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in its new pilot factory located in Akishima City, Tokyo.