Narbonne


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Narbonne

(närbôn`), city (1990 pop. 47,086), Aude dept., S France, near the Mediterranean coast. It is the commercial center of a wine-growing region and an industrial city producing sulfur, copper, and clothing. A uranium processing plant was built there in 1959. It was the first Roman colony established in Transalpine GaulGaul
, Lat. Gallia, ancient designation for the land S and W of the Rhine, W of the Alps, and N of the Pyrenees. The name was extended by the Romans to include Italy from Lucca and Rimini northwards, excluding Liguria.
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 (118 B.C.) and was known as Narbo Martius; it later became the capital of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis. Narbonne was an archiepiscopal see from the 4th cent. until 1801. The city was occupied by the Visigoths in A.D. 413 and taken by the Saracens in 719 and the Franks in 759. It later became the seat of the viscounts of Narbonne, vassals of the counts of Toulouse, and was united to the French crown in 1507. Its port, silted up in 1320, brought great wealth to the city, especially during the Middle Ages. Narbonne was an important center of the Jews in the Middle Ages. Their expulsion (late 13th cent.) and the Black Death (1310), which is said to have taken 30,000 lives, were severe blows to the city's prosperity. In Narbonne are the remains of a Roman amphitheater and bridge, the splendid St. Just Cathedral (13th–14th cent.), and an archiepiscopal palace (13th cent.), now the town hall and museum.

Narbonne

 

a city in southern France, near the Mediterranean, in the department of Aude. Population, 40,000 (1968). A transportation junction, Narbonne is a major center for the production and sale of wine. The city also has machine-building and chemical industries.

Narbonne

a city in S France: capital of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis; harbour silted up in the 14th century. Pop.: 46 510 (1999)
References in periodicals archive ?
Located on a plain that connects Europe to the Iberian Peninsula, Narbonne was an important city in the early centuries of the Common Era, fought over and controlled at various times by Romans, Visigoths and, from 719 to 759, the Saracens--as the Christians of that era called Muslims.
Narbonne offers no general reflections about the degree to which Plotinus is himself animated by a Gnostic spirit.
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Narbonne, a paleontologist at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario.
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Exergy Fuel Cells, a subsidiary of Morphic Technologies AB (STO:MORPB), has entered into a cooperation with Narbonne Accessoires in Narbonne, France, and signed a Letter Of Intent regarding the exclusive distribution of the Exergy Fuel Cell power systems in the distribution network of Narbonne Accessoires in France and Spain.
When I first read of the medieval Jewish kings of Narbonne, I felt a powerful urge to visit their seat of power, even though I knew that the travails of the 14th and later centuries had left little to see.
Narbonne defended her 600-meter title in 1 minute, 43.