Narmer


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Narmer

 

a king of ancient Egypt; one of those who united Upper and Lower Egypt around the third millennium B.C. Contemporary Egyptologists consider Narmer to be the predecessor of King Menes (Mena), founder of the First Dynasty. On a palette found at Hierakonpolis and now in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Narmer is depicted as the conqueror of Lower Egypt and the ruler of the United Kingdom of Lower and Upper Egypt.

References in periodicals archive ?
The itinerary includes 12 statues from different pharaonic eras including the Narmer Palette for the Early Dynastic, a Triad of King Menkaura dating to the 4th dynasty of the Old Kingdom, a Sphinx of king Amenemhat III belonging to the Middle Kingdom, and a New Kingdom's Statue of Amenhotep son Hapu.
The itinerary contains the Narmer Palette, the triad of king Menkaure, and the Sphinx of King Amenemhat III.
These jars date back to the reign of Egyptian Pharaoh Narmer (roughly 3000 BCE), to Aramean King Hazael (800 BCE) and to Prophet Nehemiah (400 BCE) who, according to the bible, governed Judea under Persian rule.
Archaeologists did recognize some of the symbols, which belong to kings who ruled Egypt before the first dynasty, such as King Scorpion or Narmer, he added.
This imitation of bull behavior seems to also be present in the Narmer palette, in which cattle appear at the top and the ruler appears on the bottom as a bull as shown in Figure 5.
Instead, they believe that either Narmer or Hor-Aha, both rulers of Egypt around that time, was the real Menes who unified Egypt.
A sizable portion of trade books (n = 13; 26%) included but minimized aspects of Egyptian architecture like in Ancient Egyptian Government, where only two aspects are included: "This is the Narmer Palette.
Esse tipo de acao e retratada na maca de guerra de Narmer, conservada no Ashmolean Museum (AN1890.1908.E.3631), datada do inicio do periodo dinastico.
"Egyptian Art" by Bill Manley is a beautifully and profusely illustrated account of the art of ancient Egypt that draws upon the finest works through more than 3,000 years and places celebrated masterpieces, from the Narmer palette to Tutankhamun's gold mask, in their original contexts in the tombs, temples, and palaces of the pharaohs and their citizens.
Flistorically Flierakonpolis was the large Upper Egyptian site where the Narmer Palette and other iconic ceremonial objects were found, as well as the source of the nearly unique "Painted Tomb" (Tomb 100) with its images paralleling those on Predynastic pottery.