narrowband

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narrowband

(networking)
A communication channel with a low data rate.

The term is sometimes used for an Internet connection via a dial-up modem, typically at 56 kbaud, in contrast to broadband.

narrowband

In communications, transmission rates up to T1 speeds (1.544 Mbps). The upper limit is moving target. At one time, narrowband meant 150 bps (that is 150 bits per second!). Then, the upper limit became 2,400 bps. Later, it moved to 64 Kbps. Contrast with wideband and broadband.
References in periodicals archive ?
Narrow-band UVB for the treatment of vitiligo: an emerging effective and well-tolerated therapy.
Narrow-band UVB now is considered the standard in phototherapy for treatment of vitiligo, said Dr.
The combination of low-dose acitretin with narrow-band UVB has previously been shown to speed responses, wrote Dr.
Having endured the last three months of the all-weather season, during which the narrow-band handicaps made it impossible to place a 57-rated horse of ours, I wanted to scream and knock some BHB heads together when I saw the entries for the Bank Holiday `showpiece' at Kempton.
The Handy-Color unit can measure metamerism by means of its multiple built-in lighting sources (daylight C, D65, tungsten A, cool-white fluorescent F2, and narrow-band white fluorescent F11).
Spread-spectrum technology, which was developed by the Defense Department during World War II, distributes data uniformly over a larger frequency range than that used in narrow-band transmissions.
The process for the introduction of narrow-band handicaps - an integral part of the Racing Review package that became essential in the context of the Office of Fair Trading investigation - was set in motion in April last year, and there was plenty of discussion on when best to introduce them.
The newly formed narrow-band handicaps are designed to encourage meritocracy, but have been condemned by many prominent trainers who feel the weight range is too narrow and so limits opportunities.
In 1998, in an effort to address narrow-band PMD measurement needs, NIST demonstrated a Modulation-Phase Shift (MPS) technique able to measure PMD in a narrow 4 GHz bandwidth.