Nasir ad-Din

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Nasir ad-Din

(nä`sər äd-dēn), 1831?–1896, shah of Persia (1848–96). He and his able vizier, Mirza Taqi Khan, were responsible for shaking Persia from a long period of inertia. He traveled extensively in Europe and brought back many Western ideas, some of which he applied to the reorganization of the government. Nasir ad-Din Shah had ambitions to reclaim the old Persian territories to the east and made an effort to wrest Herat from Afghanistan, but British intervention put an end to his hopes and forced Persia to recognize the claim of Afghanistan. Nasir ad-Din Shah granted numerous concessions to the British, including the Reuter concession in 1872 and the Imperial Bank of Persia in 1889. BabismBabism
, system of doctrines proclaimed in Persia in 1844 by Ali Muhammad of Shiraz. Influenced by the Shaykhi Shiite theology that viewed the Twelve Imams as incarnations of the Divine, Ali Muhammad proclaimed himself the Bab,
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 arose during his reign. He wrote travel diaries, and his simple and pithy style influenced later Persian literature. In later years, he resisted demands for reforms. He was assassinated by one of his subjects and was succeeded by Muzaffar ad-Din.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other highlights set to go up for auction include five treatises on astronomy and mathematics by Persian thinker Nasir Al-Din Muhammad Bin Muhammad Bin Al-Hasan Al-Tusi, as well as an incredible Fatimid-era gold armlet, crafted in Egypt or Syria in the 11th century.
Deir Yassin, Nasir al-Din, Haifa, Yazur, Bayt Daras, al-Tantura, al-Lydd, al-Dawayima, Saliha, Qibya, Kufr Qasim, Shuja'iyya, al-Ibrahimi mosque, al-Aqsa, and the most recent massacre of unarmed protestors in Gaza on March 31, among others, will continue to form tragic chapters in our history; yet they are also a tribute to Palestinian resilience and steadfastness." "International condemnation is critical, but it is not enough.
During this time, known as the Qajar era, rulers such as Fath-Ali Shah (reigned 1797-1834, a contemporary of Napoleon) and Nasir al-Din Shah (reigned 1848-96, a contemporary of Queen Victoria) used portraiture to convey monarchical power and dynastic grandeur."
The volume under review is an edition of an early Arabic translation of the Persian Akhlaq-e Naheri, one of the most acclaimed compendia of philosophical ethics in the Islamic tradition and one of the best-known works of the polymath Nasir al-Din Tusi (d.
40) of Hartmann's epitome of TJ's discussion of 'the life of the souls after death' in Nizam al-'alam (here corrupted to al-Nizam wal-'alam, 'Order and the world'), where TJ not only seems unaware of the abundant hadith literature on the subject, but mostly relies on hadith-nescient sources such as Ibn Sina, Farabi, Nasir al-Din al-Tusi, and Mulla Sadra.
A photography curator, Abbaspour locates the early history of photographing women in the harem in the late nineteenth-century Persian court of Nasir al-Din Shah.
135, where Al-Qaida, founded 1988/90, is blamed for the emphasis Usbat al-Ansar places on jihad, even though "Jihad against Israel and its allies" through its earlier manifestation, al-Haraka al-Islamiyah al-Mujahida, dates back to 1975; and claims of Salem al-Shahal being influenced by Nasir al-Din al-Albani during his studies in Medina in the 1940s (63), despite the fact that al-Albani did not teach there until 1961).
Lameer has prepared the first modern edition of Rukn al-Din Jurjani's (alive in 728/1327) Arabic translation of Nasir al-Din Tusi's (d.
His efforts earned him the scorn of political rivals and colonial powers alike and he was eventually demoted and later executed by Nasir al-Din Shah.
"Deir Yassin, Nasir al-Din, Haifa, Yazur, Bayt Daras, al-Tantura, al-Lydd, al-Dawayima, Saliha, Qibya, Kafr Qasim, and Shuja'iyya, among other names, will remain forever engraved in our hearts and minds and always serve as symbols of Palestinian steadfastness and perseverance."
Here, we refer to Nasir al-Din Tusi, he believes "the Sultan's private properties were obtained through inheritance or what the former kings had taken as fifth of spoils and the army (in conquered provinces) including lands, water, waterwheel, and livestock and what the ruler gained through land reclamation; gold, silver, and iron mines; pearls; workshops; trade stocks; real estate and fishing and hunting in uninhabited areas.