Delhi Sultanate

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Delhi Sultanate,

refers to the various Muslim dynasties that ruled in India (1210–1526). It was founded after Muhammad of GhorMuhammad of Ghor,
d. 1206, Afghan conqueror of N India. A brother of the sultan of Ghor, he was made governor of Ghazni in 1173 and from there launched a series of invasions of India. By 1186 he had conquered the Muslim principalities in the Punjab.
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 defeated Prithvi RajPrithvi Raj
, d. 1192, ruler of the Chauan dynasty of N India. A great warrior, he later became the subject of many romantic epics, including the Chand Raisa. He resisted the incursions of the Afghans led by Muhammad of Ghor, but in 1192 at the second battle of Taraori
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 and captured Delhi in 1192. In 1206, Qutb ud-Din, one of his generals, proclaimed himself sultan of Delhi and founded a line of rulers called the Slave dynasty, because he and several of the sultans who claimed succession from him were originally military slaves. Iltutmish (1210–35) and Balban (1266–87) were among the dynasty's most illustrious rulers. Constantly faced with revolts by conquered territories and rival families, the Slave dynasty came to an end in 1290. Under the Khalji dynasty (1290–1320), the conquests of Ala ud-Din Khalji brought Muslim dominion in India to its greatest height until the Mughul empire. Early in the reign of Muhammad Tughluq, founder of the Tughluq dynasty (1325–98), the power of Delhi was acknowledged even in the extreme S of India. His eccentric rule and ferocious temperament provoked a series of revolts, notably that of the Hindu Vijayanagar kingdom in the south, and a steady loss of territory; by his death (1351) the Hindu south had recovered its independence and the Deccan had become a separate Muslim state, the Bahmani kingdom. Under Tughluq's successors the sultanate of Delhi began to disintegrate into several small states. With the sack of Delhi by Timur in 1398, the once great sultanate fell, although local rulers lingered on at Delhi until the invasion of Babur and the MughalMughal
or Mogul
, Muslim empire in India, 1526–1857. The dynasty was founded by Babur, a Turkic chieftain who had his base in Afghanistan. Babur's invasion of India culminated in the battle of Panipat (1526) and the occupation of Delhi and Agra.
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 conquest.

Bibliography

See V. D. Mahajan, The Sultanate of Delhi (2d ed. 1963); I. Quereshi, Administration of the Sultanate of Delhi (5th ed. 1971); N. K. Hamida, Agriculture, Industrial and Urban Dynamism under the Sultans of Delhi, 1206–1555 (1986).

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References in periodicals archive ?
In 1266, on the death of Nasiruddin Mahmud Shah, the son of Iltutmish, his minister Ghiasuddin Balban took over as the Emperor of India.
Delhi Pavilion is in the cradle of the city's history -- the ramparts of Lal Kot / Qila Rai Pithora, Delhi's oldest fortresses, are within walking distance; across the road is the 800- year- old Hauz Rani village; and it's another gentle amble away from the dargah of Nasiruddin Mahmud Chiragh- i- Dilli, the Sufi master Nizamuddin Auliya's famous murid and the last of the great savants of the Chisti Order of Delhi.
AKM Nasiruddin Mahmud, registrar and spokesman for the international crimes tribunal said that the court was informed about Nizami's ill health in a letter sent by the jail authorities earlier in the morning.